The Two-Way
4:24 pm
Thu November 10, 2011

Facebook Will Reportedly Shift Privacy Policy To 'Opt In' — Not 'Opt Out'

Facebook is on the verge of adopting new "opt in" privacy settings, according to reports. Here, company founder Mark Zuckerberg speaks during a visit to Cambridge, Mass., Monday.
Darren McCollester Getty Images

Facebook moving toward changing its policy about privacy settings, abandoning an "opt-out" approach for one in which its members would have to "opt in" to allow strangers to see personal information stored on their profile pages, according to reports.

The shift is seen as a response to the Federal Trade Commission's accusation that the social media network deceived its members when it changed its policies in 2009.

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Liz Halloran joined NPR in December 2008 as Washington correspondent for Digital News, taking her print journalism career into the online news world.

Halloran came to NPR from US News & World Report, where she followed politics and the 2008 presidential election. Before the political follies, Halloran covered the Supreme Court during its historic transition — from Chief Justice William Rehnquist's death, to the John Roberts and Samuel Alito confirmation battles. She also tracked the media and wrote special reports on topics ranging from the death penalty and illegal immigration, to abortion rights and the aftermath of the Amish schoolgirl murders.

Regional
4:11 pm
Thu November 10, 2011

Dr. Lynwood Montell at 80

This special program is devoted to the work of Dr. Lynwood Montell. He was a professor in the WKU Department of Folk Studies and Anthropology for many years, and is the author of over 20 books about folk life and stories in our region. Produced by WKU Folk Studies graduate student Rachel Hopkin on the occasion of Dr. Montell's 80th birthday this year.

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It's All Politics
3:56 pm
Thu November 10, 2011

No Joint Press Conference For Cain Accusers, Lawyer Says

Cain accuser and longtime government employee Karen Kraushaar once worked as a spokesperson for the Immigration and Naturalization Service. She offered a statement after meeting with the Miami family of Elian Gonzalez in March of 2000.
Miami Herald Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 10, 2011 4:33 pm

Karen Kraushaar, who received a 1999 settlement in a workplace sexual harassment complaint against Herman Cain, has decided not to hold a joint press conference with three other women who have also alleged past harassment by the GOP presidential candidate, her attorney said Thursday afternoon.

Only Sharon Bialek, who held a press conference this week to allege that Cain made an inappropriate sexual advance when she met with him to seek help finding a job, had agreed to participate.

She is being represented by well-known lawyer, Gloria Allred.

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David Kestenbaum is a correspondent for NPR, covering science, energy issues and, most recently, the global economy for NPR's multimedia project Planet Money. David has been a science correspondent for NPR since 1999. He came to journalism the usual way — by getting a Ph.D. in physics first.

In his years at NPR, David has covered science's discoveries and its darker side, including the Northeast blackout, the anthrax attacks and the collapse of the New Orleans levees. He has also reported on energy issues, particularly nuclear and climate change.

David has won awards from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Physical Society and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

The Salt
3:36 pm
Thu November 10, 2011

Why We Lie About Using Food Thermometers

It's easy to misuse a meat thermometer.
iStockphoto.com

Come Thanksgiving, cooks tend to go rummaging in the drawer to dig out the food thermometer; it may be the day we feel most compelled to deploy the slender little probe to keep the killer microbes at bay.

Or so we say. But we may be lying.

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The Two-Way
3:29 pm
Thu November 10, 2011

U.S. Puts Oil Pipeline Plan In Limbo Until After 2012 Vote

Originally published on Thu November 10, 2011 6:15 pm

A final decision on building a new oil pipeline to connect Alberta, Canada, to U.S. refineries near the Gulf of Mexico will not be made until after the 2012 presidential election, the State Department said Thursday.

TransCanada's proposal to build the Keystone XL pipeline had come under pressure from environmentalists, as well as government officials in Nebraska. It would cost an estimated $7 billion to build.

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Bill Chappell is a blogger and producer who works with NPR's Morning Edition and Digital Media group. In addition to coordinating Web features, he frequently contributes to NPR's blogs, from The Two Way and All Tech Considered to The Salt.

The Two-Way
2:58 pm
Thu November 10, 2011

As Paterno Exits, Rumors Name Urban Meyer As Penn State Successor

With Penn State coach Joe Paterno ousted, rumors are speculating that former Florida coach Urban Meyer will be his replacement. In January, the two shook hands before the Outback Bowl.
Al Messerschmidt Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 10, 2011 6:12 pm

Could former Florida football coach Urban Meyer be the next head coach at Penn State?

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The Two-Way
2:57 pm
Thu November 10, 2011

Net Neutrality Survives Republican Challenge

Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-TX) was one of the bill's sponsors.
Brendan Hoffman Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 11, 2011 8:17 am

A Senate vote along party lines rejected a Republican proposal to overturn Federal Communications Commission rules that prevent Internet service providers from discriminating against similar websites or content providers.

The net neutrality rules, as they are called, were passed in December and the House passed a bill overturning the rules in April. Today, the Senate rejected the measure, ending the challenge. Reuters reports:

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