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Politics
11:49 am
Wed May 29, 2013

Former Miss America Unhappy with GOP Attack

Heather French Henry

Former Miss America Heather French Henry has voiced her displeasure with a GOP statement calling her a "bottom-of-the-barrel pick" to run for U.S. Senate against Republican Mitch McConnell.

French Henry said in a blog post that she'll make a decision on the race soon.

Republican Party of Kentucky spokeswoman Kelsey Cooper made the statement about French Henry last week when she announced that she is considering taking on McConnell.

French Henry likened the behavior of politicians to children, and said they need to get "a real time-out."

Several Democrats have been mulling a run against McConnell, including Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes and former Democratic Party Chairman Bill Garmer.

Actress Ashley Judd, a former Kentucky resident, had considered a run, but decided earlier this year against it.

Regional
11:32 am
Tue May 28, 2013

Wife: Slain Bardstown Officer Will Always 'Be My Hero'

Jason Ellis
Credit Bardstown Police Department

The widow of an ambushed Bardstown police officer is making her first public comments since her husband was gunned down Saturday. 

Kentucky State Police say 33-year-old officer Jason Ellis was shot multiple times after he got out of his cruiser to pick up debris on the Bluegrass Parkway in Nelson County.

Amy Ellis Tuesday morning thanked the community for an outpouring of support.

"The only reason I can get up here right now is because of prayers, and God has picked me up off the bathroom floor," said Ellis.  "I didn't want to live another second without him, but I know I have to be strong for our kids."

More than 300 people attended a candlelight vigil Monday night outside the police station.  A stream of mourners turned a police car into a makeshift memorial, covering it with flowers, flags, and balloons. 

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Regional
8:15 am
Sun May 26, 2013

A 'Bluegrass Street' Is Proposed For Owensboro

Credit City of Owensboro, KY

Officials are taking  cue from Tennessee in their effort to make Owensboro synonymous with bluegrass music.

Owensboro mayor Ron Payne wants to rename Second Street so that it reflects the city's growing reputation as a hub for bluegrass music. He says in Tennessee, Nashville, which is known for country music, has Music Row; Memphis, which is known for blues, has Beale Street.

Payne said he's already talked to City Commission members and now he's ready to hear ideas from the public for renaming the street.

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Agriculture
1:09 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Tobacco Farmers Notch Legislative Victory

Federal subsidies to tobacco farmers in Kentucky and elsewhere will continue next year, even though a majority of U.S. Senators believe they should not.  The Senate voted Thursday 52-44 to cut off the payments, but the measure required 60 votes for passage. 

California Senator.  Diane Feinstein led the effort to end taxpayer subsidies, suggesting that tobacco farmers, particularly in Kentucky, have done quite well over the past decade.

"A 2012 University of Illinois study found that productivity on Kentucky tobacco farms increased by 44% in the last ten years," asserted Feinstein.  "At the same time, tobacco farmers are seeing some of their best pay days since the 2004 buyout began."

Feinstein argued the payments need to stop because tobacco is the leading cause of preventable death in the nation.  Other critics claim the payments are too generous.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky called the measure’s defeat a big victory for tobacco growers.  The commonwealth is the nation’s top burley tobacco producer.

Regional
9:41 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Kentucky Needs More Doctors Ahead of Medicaid Expansion

The planned expansion of Kentucky's Medicaid program coupled with a push to help the uninsured obtain health coverage could exacerbate the state's shortage of physicians, according to a report released Wednesday.

Deloitte Consulting, a technology firm that's helping to set up the Kentucky Health Benefit Exchange, unveiled the report showing Kentucky's 10,475 primary care physicians and specialists are far short of the actual need.

However, the firm concluded that Kentucky would need to find ways to increase the number of doctors and other medical professionals even if it didn't expand medical coverage to more than 600,000 new patients.

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