Associated Press

Governor Mitch Daniels has built a national image as a fiscal manager with an eye for detail, but two massive accounting errors that have tilted Indiana's books by more than half-a-billion dollars threaten to tarnish that reputation as the Republican governor prepares to leave office.

The National Weather Service says a line of storms that moved through the Louisville area Friday afternoon produced an F1 tornado and knocked out power to about twelve thousand homes and businesses. Some homes were damaged, as well. The tornado struck about 13 miles southeast of downtown Louisville, and was on the ground for 2.5 miles.

A massive outbreak of severe weather Friday led to widespread thunderstorms and multiple tornadoes, resulting in dozens of deaths across Kentucky, Indiana, and Ohio.

Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear declared a statewide emergency to facilitate local authorities' access to state resources. 

The outbreak also caused problems in states to the south, including Alabama and Tennessee where dozens of houses were damaged. It comes two days after an earlier round of storms killed 13 people in the Midwest and South.

Major League Baseball expanded its playoff format to 10 teams Friday, adding a second wild-card in each league.

The decision establishes a new one-game, wild-card round in each league between the teams with the best records who are not division winners, meaning a third-place team could win the World Series.

This is the only change in baseball's playoff structure since the 1995 season, when wild-card teams were first added.

The Associated Press now says at least 12 people were killed by the storms that moved through our region Wednesday. At least 10 tornadoes touched down in Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, and Tennessee.  According to Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon, there were three fatalities in his state. According to the AP, six people died in Harrisburg, Ill. More than 100 people are said to have been injured.

Kentucky House Speaker Greg Stumbo is asking for spending records of Morehead State University's President and Regents.  Stumbo filed an Open Records Act request February 17 seeking the travel expenses and other records of President Wayne Andrews, his staff, and the 11 members of the Morehead Board of Regents.

The Indiana Senate will soon take up a statewide smoking ban. The bill passed the Indiana Senate Policy Committee on an 8-2 vote Wednesday, following the measure’s passage in the House. The smoking ban contains numerous exemptions, including those for casinos and private clubs.

Barren County Drug Task Force

Methamphetamine lab seizures rose nationally again in 2011, further evidence the powerfully addictive and dangerous drug is maintaining a tight grip on the nation's heartland, according to an Associated Press survey of the nation's top meth-producing states.

Bowling Green Republican Rand Paul says there's a growing chance that his party's presidential nominee could ultimately be chosen at a brokered convention this summer. The Kentucky Senator has a vested interested in the Republican presidential race — his father, Ron Paul, is among the candidates.

Catholic bishops have issued a stern warning about the potential consequences if Kentucky lawmakers approve a proposal to legalize casinos. Catholic Conference of Kentucky executive director Patrick Delahanty distributed a letter to state senators today detailing the concerns of the state's four Bishops who represent some 400,000 parishioners in the state.

The nation's largest protestant denomination will not be changing its name.  A panel for the Southern Baptist Convention has instead approved a new, add-on description for the denomination. 

The Kentucky Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in the legislative redistricting case this week. Chief Justice John D. Minton filed an order Friday officially accepting transfer of the case from the Kentucky Court of Appeals.

More details are emerging in the federal indictment against Barren County Sheriff Chris Eaton. He’s accused of beating a suspect in custody, filing false reports, and making false statements as part of a cover-up.

According to the indictment, a 13-year old girl was at a Glasgow church on the night of February 22, 2011, when she looked out the window and saw suspect Billy Randall Stinnett struggling with the local sheriff and several deputies.

The attorney for Barren County Sheriff Chris Eaton says a federal indictment is "unjustified" and no one used physical force on 30 year old Billy Stinnett after deputies handcuffed him.

Lawyer Guthrie True of Frankfort is representing Eaton. True told the Associated Press Thursday that the US Justice Department appeared to be "headstrong" about charging his client with a crime related to Stinnett's arrest on February 24, 2010.

A superseding indictment has been filed against an Iraqi man facing trial on terrorism charges, alleging he lied to gain refugee status and enter the U.S.  Documents were filed Wednesday in federal court in Bowling Green against 24-year-old Mohanad Shareef Hammadi, who faces a July trial. 

The two perjury charges were added to ten previous charges in which prosecutors allege Hammadi tried to funnel weapons and cash to Al-Qaida operatives in Iraq. 

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