Dan Modlin

Producer/Host

Dan Modlin served as News Director at WKU Public Radio for 23 years, and retired in early 2013. He's a native of Indiana who grew up in a broadcasting family.  A graduate of Ball State University, he worked for several years in the news network business in the Midwest, specializing in agricultural and political coverage, before coming to WKU Public Radio. His reports have earned numerous national  and state  awards for documentary production, public affairs reporting, and enterprise reporting. 

Ways to Connect

Library of Congress

This week marks the 150th anniversary of one of the most important battles of the Civil War.

In this series of three interviews, Dan Modlin speaks with WKU professors Jack Thacker and Glenn LaFantasie about the pivotal battle at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

This series of conversations discusses the battle as it unfolded over three days in July, 1863.

WKU professors Jack Thacker and Glenn LaFantasie talk about the contributions of African-American soldiers to the U.S. Civil War effort, and President Lincoln's role in arming former slaves. They also point out that black units were often placed under inexperienced and ineffective white officers.

This is the latest in WKU Public Radio's series of reports on the 150th anniversary of the Civil War.

This story is an entry in the category of Best Enterprise/Investigative report for the 2013 Kentucky Associated Press Broadcasters competition for radio.

This report by Dan Modlin, which aired on November 30, 2012, highlights a disturbing trend in prescription abuse in Kentucky: the theft of medications from senior citizens.

This report includes interview comments from a Kentucky man who says he was has been beaten by a relative so that a doctor will prescribe pain medication. Once that happens, the man's relative steals it from him.

This story is an entry from WKYU-FM in the category of Best Sports Feature/Special for the 2013 Kentucky Associated Press Broadcasters awards competition.

In this story, WKYU-FM's Dan Modlin spoke with Western Kentucky University baseball players and coaches about the techniques used by pitchers to win their battles with batters.

This audio compilation is an entry in Best Public Affairs reporting for the 2013 Kentucky Associated Press Broadcasters awards for radio.

This entry contains two stories on ovarian cancer, and how and why it's one of the most deadly forms of cancer in the world.

Bowling Green Police Department

Nearly 15 years after a Bowling Green woman went missing, her estranged husband is now wanted for her murder.  Carol Neal was reported missing from her Shawnee Drive home in 1998. 

An arrest warrant was issued this week for Leland Neal, who was last known to be in Mexico. 

Warren County Commonwealth’s Attorney Chris Cohron says the case got a boost from Neal’s other criminal offenses. "Leland Neal was already under indictment in Warren Circuit Court for some unrelated charges.  He's been on the run from those charges for some time," Cohron states.  "That really helped re-energize the case."

A massive outbreak of severe weather Friday led to widespread thunderstorms and multiple tornadoes, resulting in dozens of deaths across Kentucky, Indiana, and Ohio.

Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear declared a statewide emergency to facilitate local authorities' access to state resources. 

The outbreak also caused problems in states to the south, including Alabama and Tennessee where dozens of houses were damaged. It comes two days after an earlier round of storms killed 13 people in the Midwest and South.

The Associated Press now says at least 12 people were killed by the storms that moved through our region Wednesday. At least 10 tornadoes touched down in Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, and Tennessee.  According to Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon, there were three fatalities in his state. According to the AP, six people died in Harrisburg, Ill. More than 100 people are said to have been injured.

Update: An Amber Alert issued in Tennessee has been called off, following the discovery of two abducted children. The brother and sister were found in Maryland.

Bowling Green,KY – As the number of patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia increases, some experts in the field are offering advice for caregivers. They say trying to maintain a sense of humor and knowing when to ask for help are keys.Dan Modlin has this report, titled "Dealing with Dementia."

Many people who run through traffic lights think it's a harmless offense,  but safety experts disagree. You or a member of your family are more likely to be injured in an accident involving a "red light runner" than in any other type of traffic crash. Dan Modlin reports on Running the Red.

Questions about the role of public employee unions have prompted controversy in several states this year. State lawmakers in Indiana, Ohio, and Wisconsin have been involved in heated debates over a number of issues relating to union membership and the future of public employee unions.

Dan Modlin produced this special report on the history of organized labor in the U.S.

Clinton Lewis/WKU University Relations

Bowling Green, KY – WKU President Gary Ransdell says student retention is becoming an important measure of academic quality. Speaking to faculty and staff during his annual convocation address, Dr. Ransdell said WKU has a responsibility to help increase the number of college graduates in the state of Kentucky. During the speech, the University President also listed some key achievements and challenges facing the institution. Dan Modlin has more on the story.......

Bowling Green, KY – Civil War Historians Dr. Jack Thacker and Dr. Glen LaFantasie say President Lincoln looked at the state of Kentucky as a key pivotal area as he tried to address slavery issues in the days leading up to the start of the Civil War. Lincoln considered Kentucky to be a key strategic location, in part because of its access to the Ohio River.Dan Modlin has more on the story.........

Bowling Green, KY – A public meeting will be held in Mayfield to get public input on a new study regarding a proposed Western Kentucky corridor for Interstate 69. Officials in Kentucky are hoping that portions of existing roadways can be included in the corridor, to help manage costs. Public Information Officer Keith Todd of the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet says public comments will be accepted on the proposal until the end of November. Dan Modlin spoke with Todd.

Pages