Kevin Willis

News Director

Kevin is the News Director at WKU Public Radio.  He has been with the station since 1999, and was previously the Assistant News Director, and also served as local host of Morning Edition.  He is a broadcast journalism graduate of WKU, and has won numerous awards for his reporting and feature production.  Kevin grew up in Radcliff, Kentucky and currently lives in Glasgow.

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A WKU political analyst says voters should brace themselves for a rough general election battle this fall. Political Science Professor Scott Lasley says with Rick Santorum out of the Republican primary, Mitt Romney and President Obama can focus on something they had already started to do—blaming the other person’s ideology for the current condition of the economy.

Kentucky Transportation Cabinet crews will have a lane closure in place for southbound I-65 beginning Wednesday, April 11 at 7:00 pm until midnight. The lane closure is necessary while crews shift southbound traffic to the far left lanes between the Cumberland Parkway (mm 43) and Park City (mm 48).

Research being done in Kentucky to treat one of the great health crises of our time is getting a major boost. Monday the University of Louisville announced a new seven year, $3.4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health aimed at finding cures for cardiovascular disease.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell is blasting the White House over remarks made by President Obama regarding the Supreme Court's health care law hearings. During a speech Thursday to the Rotary Club of Lexington, Senator McConnell said the President crossed "a dangerous line this week."

Kentucky’s junior US Senator says he regrets the Bluegrass State doesn’t have a more high-profile role in the ongoing GOP presidential primary. Bowling Green Republican Rand Paul says he wouldn’t be opposed to seeing if Kentucky could move up on the primary calendar.

Forty-two year old Chris Thomason of Glasgow was once what he calls “a model citizen” who coached Little League, held a management level position at a local factory, and earned a decent living. Then he started smoking meth, and he lost everything.

Tennessee is seeing an increased number of proposals for charter schools. The rise in applications is largely due to a recent change in state law that no longer limits charters to low-income students from failing classrooms. The Tennessean reports that in Nashville alone eleven groups have applied to create new charter school operations.

Tennessee lawmakers are looking at legislation that would prevent state universities from extending non-discrimination policies to campus religious groups.  A Tennessee Senate committee has unanimously approved a bill what would forbid the University of Tennessee and the Tennessee Board of Regents Systems from applying non-discrimination rules to faith-based campus organizations.

Barren County Sheriff Chris Eaton and three deputies have entered not guilty pleas Wednesday in U.S District Court. The four are accused of civil rights violations and obstruction of justice. The Glasgow Daily Times reports Sheriff Eaton and deputies Adam Minor, Eric Guffey, and Aaron Bennett were arraigned in federal court in Bowling Green. The charges against them stem from an incident on February 22, 2011. 

Money to repaint Owensboro’s Glover H. Cary bridge is still included in the state’s two-year road plan. The $3.5 billion  plan passed the Senate Transportation Committee this week and is expected to clear the full Senate by Friday.

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