Agriculture

Agriculture
11:42 am
Wed August 14, 2013

How A Seed Saver Discovered One Of Our Favorite Tomatoes

A Cherokee purple tomato grown in Alaska in 2011.
Sherry Shiesl Tatiana's TOMATObase

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 2:04 pm

Fortunately for those of us who are suckers for novelty, every year fruits and vegetables seem to come in more bewitching colors, shapes and flavors. Lately, we've been tickled by the cotton candy grape and the vibrant orange Turkish eggplant.

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Agriculture
9:16 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Murray State Eyeing Hemp Research

Officials with Murray State University are eyeing hemp research should the crop be made legal in a federal farm bill.

The dean of the university's agriculture school, Tony Brannon, says he'd be interested in research opportunities involving hemp and focusing on how effective the crop would be.

Congress is weighing a provision to allow research into hemp as part of the 2013 farm bill. Kentucky has been pushing for the federal government to either allow it to be grown for commercial use or research.

Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer says along with Murray State, the Toyota plant in Georgetown has already shown interest in using industrial hemp for manufacturing parts for the automobiles it produces.

Agriculture
5:00 am
Sun August 11, 2013

Kentucky Hemp Commissioner: Hemp a Natural Fit for Healthy Foods, Auto Manufacturing

Efforts to once again make hemp legal to grow in the U.S. have picked up steam lately.

The chairman of Kentucky's Industrial Hemp Commission believes it's just a matter of time before the crop is once again legal in the U.S.

Brian Furnish says it was a major accomplishment to get an amendment regarding hemp added to the farm bill recently passed by the U.S. House. While there's no guarantee the amendment will be included in the version of the measure passed by the Senate, Furnish says he's confident public support for hemp farming is growing.

The Harrison County farmer told WKU Public Radio that hemp seeds could become a popular food ingredient in this country.

"It's high in protein, it doesn't have any cholesterol. It has omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in it. And really nobody knows about it here. They eat it all over the world, but here nobody has promoted it as a food source."

Furnish also thinks the crop is a natural fit with a major industry in our region--auto manufacturing. He says if hemp is once again legal to grow in the U.S, auto manufacturers could follow the lead of their European counterparts who use hemp to build vehicle parts.

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Politics
12:02 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

James Comer: Stressing Social Issues Not the Key to Election Success for the GOP

Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer
Credit Kentucky Dept. of Agriculture

WKU Public Radio's interview with Agriculture Commissioner James Comer

Kentucky’s agriculture commissioner says Republicans need to focus on the economy in order to win statewide office, as opposed to stressing social issues.

In an interview at WKU Public Radio Wednesday, James Comer said the GOP has alienated a lot of key voting groups by making hot-button social topics the cornerstone of their campaigns.

“I’m proud to be a social conservative, but I’m not going to run any campaign in the future—regardless of what I run for—specifically on social issues. That has driven off young voters, and that has driven off female voters.”

Comer’s comments echo much of what Kentucky U.S. Senator Rand Paul has said recently about the future of the GOP, and the party’s need to become more attractive to groups of voters that will determine Republicans’ future electoral prospects.

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Agriculture
8:51 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner Hails Historic Hemp Vote

Industrial hemp production is legal in most countries, but not in the U.S.

Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer is cheering House passage of legislation to allow university research on industrial hemp. The measure was an amendment to the farm bill that passed in the U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday.

“Without a doubt, this was an historic day for industrial hemp in America,” Comer said. “There’s a long way to go in the legislative process. And I won’t be satisfied until Kentucky farmers can legally grow industrial hemp again. But I am pleased that we have made it this far.”

The amendment would allow colleges and universities to grow hemp for research purposes in states where hemp production is allowed by state law.

U.S. Rep. Thomas Massie of Vanceburg was one of three co-sponsors of the amendment and has filed a bill that would remove hemp from the federal definition of marijuana.  U.S. Senators Mitch McConnell and Rand Paul, and Reps. Andy Barr, Brett Guthrie, and Ed Whitfield also have also publicly supported restoring legal hemp production to Kentucky.

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Agriculture
10:21 am
Mon July 8, 2013

New "Udderly Kentucky" Line Features Milk 100% Sourced and Processed in Bluegrass State

The new milk program is part of the Kentucky Proud effort.
Credit Kentucky Dept. of Agriculture

A new partnership in Kentucky is combining the efforts of state dairy farmers and the world's largest retailer.

Agriculture Commissioner James Comer announced Monday that Walmart stores in central and south-central Kentucky will soon begin stocking a line of milk products that is sourced and processed entirely at commonwealth dairy farms.

Calling it one of the most significant developments in the history of the Kentucky Proud marketing program. Comer unveiled the “Udderly Kentucky” partnership, which will stock Walmart stores in the Bluegrass State with milk from 105 Kentucky dairy farms.

The program will return a 7-cent-per-gallon premium to each participating supplier. According to Comer, the average participating Kentucky dairy operation will generate $19,000 annually from the agreement.

Comer told WKU Public Radio he's been working on the partnership with Walmart since he took office in 2012. And he says he’s aware that many in the local-food movement eye Walmart with a great deal of suspicion and even disdain, given controversy surrounding the company’s business and employment practices.

Comer says he brought the issue up with the retailer when negotiating the deal.

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Agriculture
1:24 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

U.S. House Adds Hemp Measure, but Ultimately Votes Down Farm Bill

Industrial hemp production is legal in most countries, but not in the U.S.

For industrial hemp supporters, Thursday’s farm bill vote in the U.S. House is a case of good news and bad news.

The good news: a bi-partisan amendment passed a floor vote and was added to the $940 billion farm bill package.

The bad news: that farm bill was ultimately voted down, with 195 House members voting in favor, and 234 voting against.

The hemp amendment was co-sponsored by Kentucky’s Fourth District Representative Thomas Massie, and would allow colleges and universities to grow and cultivate hemp for academic and agricultural research purposes. It would apply to states where industrial hemp growth has been legalized.

Nineteen states have passed pro-hemp legislation, while nine others—including Kentucky—have removed certain barriers to the crop’s production.

Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner and Monroe County native James Comer recently led a delegation to Washington D.C. to lobby lawmakers and White House officials on behalf of hemp legalization.

Agriculture
1:12 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Beshear Writes Letter to President, Asking for Help with Hemp Issue

Hemp was once legally grown throughout the U.S.

Governor Steve Beshear sent a letter to President Obama this week asking for help in identifying economic opportunities for industrial hemp production.

In the letter, Beshear asked the U.S. Attorney General, Agriculture Secretary, D.E.A., and others to look for ways hemp could eventually be grown and marketed that don’t negatively impact Kentucky’s drug eradication efforts.

In April, Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer led a bipartisan delegation to Washington to lobby lawmakers and White House officials to legalize industrial hemp. Kentucky lawmakers this year passed a bill that would set up the regulatory framework for growing and marketing hemp if the crop is removed from the federal government’s list of banned substances.

Agriculture
11:42 am
Fri June 7, 2013

McConnell, Paul Vow to Carry on Fight for Legalizing Hemp

Kentucky's Senators want hemp, once legal in the U.S., to be grown once again in this country.

Kentucky’s two U.S. Senators are upset that an industrial hemp measure will not be a part of a farm bill taken up next week. Mitch McConnell and Rand Paul both say they will vote against the measure, calling it “regrettable” that different amendments including the Senator’s hemp addition won’t be considered.

The amendment supported by the Kentuckians would have exempted hemp with 0.3 percent less of THC from the list of banned drugs prohibited by the federal government. THC is the psychoactive compound present in marijuana that creates a high when the drug is smoked.

In a joint statement, Senators McConnell and Paul said they weren’t giving up on getting industrial hemp legalized, and would look at other ways to get federal law changed.

The actions follow this year’s vote by Kentucky lawmakers to create a regulatory framework for hemp production if the federal government legalizes the crop.

Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer has made hemp legalization his number one legislative priority, and led a bi-partisan group to Washington D.C. in May to lobby lawmakers, White House officials, and others on the issue.

Agriculture
1:09 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Tobacco Farmers Notch Legislative Victory

Federal subsidies to tobacco farmers in Kentucky and elsewhere will continue next year, even though a majority of U.S. Senators believe they should not.  The Senate voted Thursday 52-44 to cut off the payments, but the measure required 60 votes for passage. 

California Senator.  Diane Feinstein led the effort to end taxpayer subsidies, suggesting that tobacco farmers, particularly in Kentucky, have done quite well over the past decade.

"A 2012 University of Illinois study found that productivity on Kentucky tobacco farms increased by 44% in the last ten years," asserted Feinstein.  "At the same time, tobacco farmers are seeing some of their best pay days since the 2004 buyout began."

Feinstein argued the payments need to stop because tobacco is the leading cause of preventable death in the nation.  Other critics claim the payments are too generous.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky called the measure’s defeat a big victory for tobacco growers.  The commonwealth is the nation’s top burley tobacco producer.

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