Bowling Green

Joe Corcoran photo

The next four days are a bargain hunter's dream as the 11th annual "400 Mile Sale" returns to the Commonwealth. It's Kentucky's yard sale, stretching along Highway 68 from Maysville to Paducah and into western Tennessee, and giving people a chance to show off their trash and treasures to anyone and everyone willing to stop and look.

This is the fourth year Wayne Wade has set up shop at his friend's yard in Warren County. He says he likes the spot since it's under two big trees that give them shade from the sun and cover from the rain.

Holley Performance Products says the research and development facility at their Bowling Green headquarters will bring a $1.3 million investment and create 20 new jobs. It's being described as a work cell for designing new exhaust systems.

The work cell will develop and prove new designs, processes and manufacturing techniques. It will focus on improving processes and methods in order to decrease production time, accommodate sales volume and maintain high quality of products.

The facility will allow Holley to expand its exhaust product lines under their Hooker Header and Flowtech brands including premium quality exhaust systems for late model muscle cars and trucks and classic vehicles.

Holley has been in Bowling Green since 1951. It employs more than 250 people at its Russellville Road facility.

visitbgky.com

Members of Bowling Green’s Bosnian-American community are uniting to help family and friends in Europe who have been impacted by flooding.

Bosnia-Hercegovina, Croatia, and Serbia have been devastated this month by the worst flooding to hit the Balkans in over a century. In response, Bowling Green residents of Bosnian descent are working to generate funds for those who have lost everything in the high waters.

Recent WKU graduate Mersiha Demirovic says the effort has allowed local Bosnian-Americans to look past ethnic divisions and unite under a single cause.

“Rather than just one group coming together to organize the event, we have members of several different ethnic groups from Bosnia coming together to help with this event,” she told WKU Public Radio.

A flood-relief fundraiser Saturday in Bowling Green is designed to generate money to purchase medical supplies for those impacted by the flooding.

“We found a company in Louisville that said they would ship six to eight tons of medical supplies to Bosnia, but we just have to pay for shipping,” said Djana Salihbasic.

City of Owensboro

The mayor of Owensboro says the city should consider trying to annex nearby subdivisions in order to boost its population.

Ron Payne made the comments following the release of census numbers showing Bowling Green has grown at a faster pace than Owensboro.

Those figures from the U.S. Census Bureau reflect populations on July 1, 2013.

Bowling Green retained its position as the state’s third-largest city, with a population of 61,488 people. Owensboro remained fourth-largest, with just over 58,416.

That 3,072-person advantage by Bowling Green is more than the gap between the two cities during the 2010 census. Four years ago, Bowling Green had just an 800-person advantage.

The Messenger-Inquirer reports Owensboro Mayor Ron Payne and City Manager Bill Parrish are talking about meeting with homeowner associations in subdivisions along Kentucky 54 in order to gauge their interest in being annexed by the city.

A hearing officer in the non-resident student dispute between the two school districts recommended Tuesday that the city schools continue to be permitted to enroll 750 county students for the next school year. Those students have to apply to city schools to be accepted and pay a tuition.

“The WCPS Board is committed to doing what is fair and equitable for all kids and this belief remains steadfast," Warren County Superintendent Rob Clayton said in a news release.  "Our Board is not in position to enter into a nonresident contract unless the agreement is transparent, fair and equitable for all students and the Hearing Officer’s recommendation is in stark contrast to this position."

Hearing officer Mike Wilson's recommendation now goes to Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday for his final ruling, which could still be appealed to the Kentucky State Board of Education.

Wilson's recommendation on the number of county students accepted was virtually identical to a decision he handed down last year. Among the findings in the 40 page report were the opinions that there's no evidence to suggest the non-resident process that Bowling Green uses is unfair. The recommendation did not suggest any guideline or deadlines for future negotiations.

The two school districts have been at odds for more than a year regarding the non-resident student cap.

Abbey Oldham

Warren County voters have set the field for some important local November matchups.

David Lanphear emerged at the top vote-getter in a five-way primary for Warren County Family Court Judge. Rebecca Adams Simpson came in second place, only one point behind Lanphear.

Lanphear and Adams Simpson both move on to the November general election. The judgeship was formerly held by Margaret Huddleston, who died from cancer in January.

Of the nine candidates for Bowling Green City Commission, eight will compete in the fall, and ultimately four will be elected. Incumbent Joe Denning received the most votes, followed closely behind incumbent Melinda Hill and challenger Sue Perrigin.

Rounding out the field that will appear on the November ballot are Rick Williams, Slim Nash, Mike Clark, Mark Bradford, and Don Langley.

ShopHQ

ShopHQ is expanding its distribution and call center in Bowling Green.  The governor’s office says the $25 million investment is expected to bring 150 new, full-time jobs to Warren County.  

ShopHQ, which originally moved to town in 1997, is planning to start work immediately to expand its 260,000 square foot center on Nashville Rd.

When it’s complete in 2015, the center will be 600,000 square feet.  ShopHQ is receiving up to $480,000 dollars in tax incentives from the state.

The forecast for rain this weekend has led to the cancelation of the Stucky Music Festival set for Saturday near the Corvette Museum in Bowling Green.

Thirteen bands had been scheduled to play throughout the day Saturday. Organizers say tickets purchased online have already been refunded, while those who purchased them in person will need to return them for a refund.

The event will not be re-scheduled.

Emil Moffatt

The journey across Kentucky continues Thursday morning for 150 military veterans taking part in the Ride 2 Recovery Bluegrass Challenge.  

Dan Wermuth was an avid cyclist growing up.  But a broken back suffered during the Vietnam War kept him away from the bike for years.  That was until a Ride 2 Recovery event came through the Florida town in which he was living.  Since then, he’s taken part in 10 rides, but many of his fellow cyclists are much younger veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

“I have a lot of connection with them because…especially coming from the era that I did – they didn’t appreciate us so much when we came home. That’s an understatement.  We will not let that happen for our young guys,” said Wermuth. 

Abbey Oldham

Cathy Roemer-Garrison is always looking out for innovative ways to teach.  She’s an English as a Second Language instructor at Moss Middle School in Warren County. 

"I came across on the Internet something about children reading to shelter animals, and that the research showed it was successful at improving reading fluency and building self-esteem, which is a perfect fit for my ELL kids," explained Roemer-Garrison.

She took the idea to Principal David Nole, who admits he was skeptical at first.

"I thought, 'How's that going to improve what we're doing?'  The more I listened the more I realized she was going about the heart of the reader, and that's just developing the love to read," Nole said.

And so it began.  An initiative called Paw Pals: Literacy with Love.  Every Wednesday, Roemer-Garrison visits the Bowling Green-Warren County Humane Society with a group of ELL students, or English Language Learners.  Most are from war-torn countries, but at the shelter, those memories are overcome with smiles and laughter.

On this visit, a shelter employee brings out eight-week-old long-haired Chihuahuas.

Seventh graders Graciella Ventura of El Salvador, and Soe Meh and Bway Baw both of Thailand, sit in a circle, each holding a puppy and a book.  Storytime is about to begin.  Ventura has a wide grin as one of the puppies licks her face.

Southern Kentucky Book Fest

An organizer of an upcoming book festival in Bowling Green says it’s becoming more of a challenge to get authors at larger publishers to appear at events for free.

Kristie Lowry is literary outreach coordinator with WKU Libraries, and an organizer with the Southern Kentucky Book Festival. She says book companies have cut their budgets related to book tours and marketing campaigns.

“So getting the authors to come to an event like ours for free, which would have been a little easier back in the day, is harder to do now,” Lowry told WKU Public Radio. “And Penguin and Random House have their own speaker bureaus now, so they market their authors, but you have to pay a fee in order to have them come into town.”

Lowry says another growing trend in the literary world is the rising number of self-published authors. She says many self-published writers in the southern Kentucky region, like Allison Jewell and Jennie Brown, have loyal followings and are well-received when they appear on panels at local book festivals.

What’s being called an industrial incident at the Kobe Aluminum Automotive Plant in Bowling Green has left two people injured. The Bowling Green Fire Department says the two people were airlifted to a trauma center, but the extent of their injuries is unknown. 

Seven units and 15 firefighters responded to the scene just before 2 p.m. Tuesday afternoon. But emergency officials say there was no fire.

A 62-year-old Bowling Green man has died at a Nashville hospital, nearly one week after he was found beaten on the porch of his home. The attack happened on the afternoon of April 14 on Sunrise Drive.  

Bowling Green police say the victim, Gary L. Wynn, died of his injuries early Monday morning.  Officer Ronnie Ward says police have surveillance video of three men who were in the area at the time of the incident.

“Whether they were the ones or whether they saw something, we certainly want to identify them," said Ward.  "As far as the motive goes, we really don’t have any.  We don’t know if it was a robbery or a burglary that had gone wrong. We really don’t have an idea at this point.”

Ward says they’ve been investigating the incident as a homicide from the outset.

Kentucky Executive Appointed to Hunger Commission

Apr 14, 2014

A Bowling Green business executive has been appointed to serve on the National Commission on Hunger. Spencer A. Coates was selected by Kentucky Senator Mitch McConnell. Coates is president of Houchens Industries, a diversified employee-owned company with roots in retail grocery and convenience stores.

The Commission is made up of ten people selected by Congressional leaders. The Commission will make recommendations to Congress and the Secretary of Agriculture on how to modernize and improve federal food assistance programs.

McConnell says Coates is a great fit for the new commission. He says Coates has front-line experience dealing with how and where people use food assistance programs.

Coates also serves on the Board of Directors of the National Grocers' Associations.

National Corvette Museum

The last Corvette remaining in the giant, 50-foot sinkhole at the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green has been removed. 

Crews pulled up the badly-crushed,  2001 Mallett Hammer Z-06 using a crane Wednesday afternoon.

"You would think there would be tears of happiness to pull the last one out, but it's not even recognizable, so I think that created a somber mood among everybody," said the museum's Communications Director Katie Frassinelli.  "You usually save the best for last, but in this case, it was definitely the worst."

The Mallett Hammer was one of two Corvettes that had not been seen since the February 12th sinkhole collapse. 

The car was donated to the museum last December by a Florida couple who modified it into a racing car.  The Mallett Hammer was supposed to be used at the new Motorsports Park.

All eight cars will be on display at the museum through early August. They will then be shipped to Michigan for restoration. 

It took nearly two months to unearth all eight vintage automobiles. 

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