Brett Guthrie

Lisa Autry

Kentucky’s Second District Congressman is holding what his office is calling “Conversations with Constituents” in three parts of our listening area this week.

Republican Brett Guthrie will be in Radcliff Monday, April, at the Colvin Community Center.

He’ll be in Danville Tuesday afternoon at the Boyle County Public Library, and at the Western Kentucky University campus in Owensboro Wednesday

All of the events begin at 3 p.m. local time.

Guthrie’s office says the gatherings will be unscripted, and will allow local citizens to address the Bowling Green Congressman about any issue they feel is important.

Lisa Autry

Kentucky Congressman Brett Guthrie says a number of actions can be taken to improve school safety without banning assault-style weapons. 

The Republican lawmaker held a town hall in Bowling Green on Monday dubbed "A Conversation With Constituents."

The event drew a small, but passionate crowd frustrated by Congress’ inaction on gun control. Congressman Guthrie said he thinks the most effective response to school shootings is adding resource officers in every school.

"If people go into schools, if they illegally walk into schools with a gun, they know no one else in there has one unless it's a resource officer," Guthrie told WKU Public Radio.  "When you have a sign that says, 'This is a gun-free zone,' and then someone walks in with a gun, they know it's a gun-free zone."

GOP US Rep. Guthrie Files for Re-election in Kentucky

Nov 27, 2017
Office of U.S. Rep. Brett Guthrie

Republican Kentucky Rep. Brett Guthrie has filed for re-election to the U.S. House of Representatives.

Guthrie was first elected from Kentucky's 2nd Congressional district in 2008. He won contested re-election campaigns in 2010, 2012 and 2014. In 2016, Guthrie was unopposed in the general election. The district covers some of the western and central parts of the state, including Bowling Green, Owensboro and Elizabethtown.

Guthrie has more than $2 million on hand in his campaign account, according to records with the Federal Election Commission.

Becca Schimmel

Congressman Brett Guthrie said he’s not sure if his Republican colleagues in the Senate will be able to repeal and replace Obamacare this year. He made these comments at a town hall style gathering Wednesday in Bowling Green.

Guthrie said he supports repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act at the same time. The Bowling Green Republican said the House did its job by sending a bill to the Senate that would have accomplished that task. But the Senate wasn’t able to get 50 votes to pass several versions of reform. Guthrie said he isn’t sure if repeal and replace will happen this year.

Lisa Autry

A Kentucky congressman says he’s convinced that Russia tried to interfere in this country’s presidential election. 

However, Representative Brett Guthrie says there is no evidence that President Donald Trump was involved.

"There's no evidence at all of any collusion between what Russia did, or attempted to do, and the Trump administration," stated Guthrie.  "That's what the special counsel Robert Mueller is looking into, but my point is let's not create facts before they exist."

In a speech to the Bowling Green Noon Rotary Club Wednesday, Congressman Guthrie said he thinks Russia was behind the hacking of Democratic National Committee emails which proved embarrassing for Hillary Clinton's campaign.

David Brinkley

Kentucky’s Second District Congressman thinks lawmakers will need to have a greater say in any future U.S. military action in Syria.

Bowling Green Republican Brett Guthrie said it remains to be seen if the Syrian regime will change its behavior after last week’s U.S. missile attack on an airfield. His comments come as questions are raised over the role Congress should play in approving the kinds of strikes carried out

“And I actually do think the president had the authority to do what he did the other day, but I think if we’re going to engage and move forward, it needs to have Congressional authorization,” Rep. Guthrie said. “I said that when President Obama was president, and I’ll say it now.”

Rhonda J Miller

A group of  citizens from the Bowling Green area met with Republican Congressman Brett Guthrie on Feb. 22 to express concern about issues that have arisen with the administration of President Trump. Maureen Davis is a spokeswoman for the group of seven area residents that met with Guthrie.

Basically our number one concern is making sure that he supports an independent investigation into the interference of Russia in our election. There’s a bill that’s been presented in the House to that effect.”

That proposed legislation, H.R. 356, is a House of Representatives bill that would establish a national commission to investigate foreign interference in the 2016 election.

Guthrie didn’t promise the group that he will support that particular bill, but he did say a bipartisan committee is being formed to look into the issue.

Kevin Willis

Kentucky’s Second District Congressman says his party needs to tone down some of its rhetoric about illegal immigration, and better explain how its economic policies could help those coming to the country legally.

Bowling Green Republican Brett Guthrie told WKU Public Radio Monday that the GOP is missing opportunities to appeal to immigrants who arrived in America legally in search of jobs and a better life.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has proposed banning all Muslims from entering the U.S., and has called for a wall to be built between the U.S. and Mexico. Guthrie says Republicans can’t afford to be painted as a party unwelcoming to immigrants.

“We as a party can’t look like we’re against people coming here legally,” Guthrie said. Instead, the Warren County lawmaker said Republicans need to reach out to immigrants wanting to “invest in the American Dream and the American future. Guthrie said he thought “some of the rhetoric gets hot,” leaving some voters with a negative impression of the party.

Kevin Willis

Kentucky’s Second District Congressman is predicting a major “re-write” of the Affordable Care Act next year.

Bowling Green Republican Brett Guthrie would have an up-close view of such an effort, as he was named vice-chair of a key House Health Subcommittee Wednesday.

Guthrie says the complicated structure of the federal health law makes it difficult to change certain aspects of the A.C.A without creating unintended consequences elsewhere.

“You hear a lot of people say, ‘let’s keep what we like and fix what we don’t like.’ And there are things that we need as part of our system. We need to make sure that people have health care if they’re sick, and pre-existing conditions don’t push them out of the marketplace.”

But the Bowling Green Republican said adding so many additional Americans to the healthcare system made it impossible for President Obama to keep his pledge that everyone could keep the doctor and health plan that they wanted.

The Congressman also expressed concern about states—like Kentucky—that expanded their Medicaid rolls as part of Obamacare.

Second district Republican Congressman Brett Guthrie calls the members of ISIL "evil people that need to be stopped.

Speaking in Bowling Green, Guthrie said he supports Obama's actions fighting ISIL in Syria, especially bringing in other countries to join the fight. He said he wants to see "their boots on the ground, not our boots on the ground."

The Bowling Green Republican held a late afternoon Town Hall meeting at WKU's Carroll Knicely Center Wednesday; he'll hold one more next week in Edmonson County.

Kevin Willis

Kentucky’s Second District Congressman says his vote in favor of the President’s plan to train moderate Syrian rebels was based largely on his desire to keep U.S. ground forces out of the effort. 

Bowling Green Republican Brett Guthrie told WKU Public Radio he wants to see ground forces from Middle Eastern countries taking on the Islamic State, also known as ISIL.

While Guthrie says he understands the reluctance of some lawmakers who voted against the measure that ultimately passed the House Wednesday, he believes it’s in the country’s interests to help those fighting the Islamic State.

“If we don’t engage them in Syria, then that will become a safe haven. It’s like the Vietnam War and Cambodia, when every time we would push (the VietCong soldiers), they would cross back into an international border that we were not allowed to cross. So if they have a safe haven, they can retreat, they can wait, and they can come back.”

Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce

One of the candidates in the highly-contested Kentucky U.S. Senate race has agreed to take part in an event in Owensboro next month.  

Incumbent Senator Mitch McConnell confirmed he will appear at the Red, White & Blue Picnic on Aug. 26.  The event is sponsored by the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce. McConnell’s Democratic challenger Allison Lundergan Grimes has not said whether she’ll attend. 

Abbey Oldham/WKU Public Radio

Republican efforts to win control of the Kentucky House got a boost from a national figure Saturday.

The incoming U.S. House Majority Leader, Kevin McCarthy, was in Bowling Green to raise money for the Republican Party of Kentucky House Trust. McCarthy visited the commonwealth at the request of the state’s 2nd District Congressman, Brett Guthrie of Warren County.

Speaking to reporters before the fundraiser, Rep. McCarthy said what happens in state legislatures can often trickle up to the nation's capital.

“I feel states are able to show and be a generator of ideas greater than Washington--that you can do the pilot programs,” the California Republican said. “The whole concept of welfare reform came from states. States don’t get to print more money. States have to balance a budget. States have to move forward. They carry out agencies they didn’t create.”

Democrats have controlled the Kentucky House for over 90 years, and the party’s state leaders say they will continue to hold the chamber despite the amount of GOP money being raised ahead of the November election. Republicans would have to win a net gain of five seats this fall to take control of the House.

Multiple super PACs have been created by Republicans this year to boost their party’s efforts to win the chamber, including a group founded by GOP gubernatorial candidate Hal Heiner, and a PAC run by a Kentuckian who served as a top aide to Mitt Romney’s 2012 presidential campaign.

Broadening the Republican Party’s Appeal?

During his visit to The Club at Olde Stone in Bowling Green, McCarthy said he agreed with Kentucky Senator Rand Paul’s recent statements about Republicans needing to expand the party’s appeal to groups that haven’t recently voted for the GOP in large numbers, such as African-Americans, Hispanics, and young people.

Guthrie Reelection Campaign Reports Second Quarter Numbers

Jul 10, 2014
Kevin Willis

The reelection campaign of Kentucky Congressman Brett Guthrie reports having over $1.5 million in cash-on-hand.

The Warren County Republican is running for a fourth term in the U.S. House, and is being challenged this fall by Democrat Ron Leach of Meade County. In reports filed with the Federal Election Commission Thursday, Guthrie’s campaign said it raised over $321,000 during the second quarter.

Guthrie’s re-election committee says it has donated about 20-percent of the money raised this election cycle with groups such as the state Republican Party and the National Republican Congressional Committee.

Kentucky Congressman Brett Guthrie says he strongly considered running for governor next year, but ultimately decided against it for family reasons.

The Bowling Green Republican told students at Daviess County High School Monday that he believes he would have “had a good chance” at winning the race.

The Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer reports Guthrie said he didn’t want to be campaigning across the state during his 16-year-old daughter’s last few years at home.

Guthrie was first elected as Kentucky’s Second District Congressman in 2008 after serving in the Kentucky state Senate.

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