Business news

More than a dozen Republican members of Congress—including Kentucky Senator Mitch McConnell-- hope to file a friend-of-the-court brief in Hobby Lobby Stores Inc.'s lawsuit that challenges the federal government's requirement that health insurance cover the morning-after pill.

Valley Truck LLC is investing more than $600,000 in improvements at its facility in Utica, Kentucky. The firm will expand its workforce by a dozen jobs,  as part of the investment.

Preliminary findings from a study commissioned by lawmakers to help find a solution to a rate dispute between two western Kentucky aluminum smelters and a regional utility painted a grim outlook.

Kentucky's long-awaited tax amnesty program will get started next month. The program is part of the two-year budget the General Assembly passed earlier this year. And any person or business who owes back taxes will be allowed to participate.

Dan Modlin / WKU Public Radio

The latest federal data shows the nation's top tobacco companies have reduced spending on advertising and promotion of cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products in recent years. Figures from the Federal Trade Commission show cigarette marketing declined more than five percent to $8.05 billion from 2009 to 2010, the latest year for which figures are available.

A program dedicated to showcasing Kentucky food could be headed to a Walmart near you. Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer says the world's largest retailer has agreed to stock Kentucky Proud shelves in some of its Bluegrass State stores, which would contain food and other products made in the commonwealth.

Tru-Check Incorporated has built a new national headquarters facility in Somerset, and is announcing  plans to create ten new jobs. The company, which provides meter services to gas, water, and electric utility firms, is investing about $1.2 million in the new facility.

A biofuel company is planning to build a new plant in southern Kentucky that would convert sugar beets into fuel over the next two years if it can get approval from the state. Patriot Bioenergy Corp., which has an office in Williamsburg, wants to locate the facility in Whitley County if the infrastructure is built and the Kentucky Economic Development or Energy Incentives boards approve of the project.

An Owensboro restaurant owner is hoping to revive the restaurant association for the city, which has been without such an organization for nearly two decades. 

Larry Kirk, who owns The Miller House, says he's spoken with more than 35 restaurant owners who are interested in creating a new association. 

Some scam artists are using phony grant offers to get money or personal information from consumers. The Better Business Bureau of Louisville, southern Indiana and Western Kentucky says they’ve received several complaints about fake offers for free federal grants. Some consumers have been offered “free” grants for education purposes, but were later  asked to wire a $7,000 fee.

The Kentucky lottery plans to drop its nightly televised program and instead stream the drawings online.  A lot has changed since the state lottery began more than two decades ago. 

The Ellis Park race track in Western Kentucky ushered in a new era Friday.  The 90-year-old Henderson track rolled out instant racing to the public, becoming only the second track in the state to offer the games. 

A preliminary report shows Kentucky homeowners are benefiting from a settlement reached with the nation’s top five mortgage servicers.  The five banks in the settlement are Bank of America, JP Morgan Chase, Wells Fargo, Citi, and Ally/GMAC. 

The long-awaited project to build two new Ohio River bridges in the Louisville, Ky., area is reaching a milestone on the Indiana side. The governors of Indiana and Kentucky are scheduled to attend a Thursday groundbreaking for the project that has been discussed for decades. Federal Highway Administrator Victor Mendez is also expected to attend the event in Jeffersonville.

Kevin Willis

When you walk into the downtown office of VE Creative, one of the first things you notice is the set of huge windows facing Owensboro’s 3rd street, a few blocks from the Ohio River. For the small group of workers here, these windows aren’t just a way to view the pretty scenery outside. They’re also a potential way to help generate online and social media street cred for the company, and--more importantly--downtown Owensboro.