Economy

Kentucky's General Fund Receipts increased by 5.3 percent last month, compared to September of last year. However, revenues  for the first quarter still fell below the pace needed to meet the official estimate. Meanwhile, road funds declined 3.9 percent.

Notices are going out in the mail to an estimated 37,000 Tennessee borrowers who may be eligible for payment under a $25 billion national mortgage foreclosure settlement. Eligible borrowers will be receiving claim forms in the mail this month and Attorney General Bob Cooper of Tennessee urged residents to complete the forms and return them by the January 18, 2013 deadline.

Kentucky’s Blue Ribbon Tax Commission has spent months learning how the state’s tax system works, and is now beginning to hammer out proposals to reform the state’s tax code. The commission met again this week  in Frankfort to hear some final reports from the Beshear administration on how Kentucky’s current revenue systems work.

“The Cost of Crime,” a new study by a Centre College professor, quantifies the burden of crime by estimating the annual cost of crime in the United States. Many studies measure crime by looking at raw numbers of thefts, murders and other criminal activities. David A. Anderson, Centre College’s Paul G. Blazer Professor of Economics, warns that these numbers can be misleading, especially when the number of crimes goes in one direction while the severity of crimes goes in the other.

Governor Steve Beshear is trying to raise awareness of Kentucky's offer of amnesty to delinquent taxpayers in hopes of filling state coffers with overdue cash. Beshear kicked off the first day of the amnesty offer Monday with a Capitol press conference, saying delinquent taxpayers can pay up without fear of penalties or prosecution.

Gov. Steve Beshear says he hasn't reached a conclusion on whether Kentucky should borrow enough money through the sale of government bonds to shore up the pension systems for state and local employees. The state employee retirement plan faces a $19 billion shortfall. Add to that the financial woes in plans covering local government employees, state police, teachers, lawmakers, judges and other court workers, and the shortfall reaches $30 billion.

An annual report that describes the state’s financial outlook shows that Kentucky has once again gone deeper into debt. The report, when compared with past years, shows the state added more than $110 million in debt during the last fiscal year.

When it comes to keeping a vehicle on the road, Kentucky ranks in the top 10 of a new survey. Unfortunately, it’s not a survey you want to rank high in.

WKU Public Radio

The latest figures from the state reveal that Kentucky's seasonally-adjusted preliminary unemployment rate has increased again. Kentucky’s manufacturing sector lost 500 jobs in August, compared to the previous month,and the professional and business services sector lost 600 jobs last month. Employment in the educational and health services sector dropped by 800 jobs in August.

Kentuckians are being urged to watch their mailboxes for postcards alerting them to a financial settlement. Notices were mailed Monday to more than 5,000 Kentuckians who were foreclosed upon between Jan. 1, 2008, and Dec. 31, 2011, and are now eligible for a share of $10.7 million.

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