Education

Clinton Lewis

The new president of Western Kentucky University believes the school needs to get back to the basics.

In his first convocation to faculty and staff Friday morning, Timothy Caboni outlined the process of developing a new strategic plan for the university. 

The process will be led by a ten to 14-member steering committee, which Caboni will co-chair.  A faculty member will be announced in a few weeks to serve as the other co-chair.  Working groups will also be formed to focus on areas such as student success, diversity, research, and scholarships.

Kate Howard

The University of Louisville hit a stumbling block in its attempted turnaround Monday when a legislative committee rejected its plan to spend $1.25 million on outside lawyers.

Five of eight members of the government contract review committee rejected the school’s amended legal contract. The legislators cited the millions of dollars that have already been approved in the wake of a scathing forensic investigation of the nonprofit U of L Foundation.

J. Tyler Franklin

The University of Louisville has filed its appeal of punishment handed down by the NCAA for violations committed to the men’s basketball program.

The penalties were imposed after an investigation into allegations that former staff member Andre McGee arranged stripper shows and sex parties for Cardinal players and recruits over a nearly four-year period.

Pixabay

The future of sex education for some classrooms across the country is up for debate as President Trump’s proposed 2018 budget allocates a majority of funding towards abstinence-centered programs. Abstinence education is already required in Kentucky schools, where many high school students will encounter it in their mandatory health class. There, the classroom experience can end up being very different for female students compared to their male counterparts.

Megan Durbin is a few years removed from her sex education class at Calloway County High School, but she remembers it like it was yesterday. As a freshman she and the other girls were in separate classroom as a guest lecturer passed around a rose, telling each girl to remove a petal.


J. Tyler Franklin

A small, exclusive group of University of Louisville trustees will decide whether to sue, settle, or take no action to recover money misspent at the U of L Foundation.

The board of trustees on Thursday created a special litigation committee empowered to “take any and all actions it deems appropriate” to recover an estimated $40-$100 million in endowment funds allegedly overspent by former officials.

It's a fall tradition: Students don college sweatshirts and their parents, meanwhile, sweat the tuition bills.

One flash-in-the-pan movie this summer even featured a couple, played by Will Ferrell and Amy Poehler, who start a casino to cope with their kids' college costs.

Annual tuition hikes have been pretty much a given in higher ed, but recently, there are signs that the decades-long rise in college costs is nearing a peak.

To see this month's total solar eclipse, the first one to be visible from the contiguous United States in nearly 40 years, all Donald Liebenberg will have to do is open his front door and step outside.

"It's a really special treat to be able to have one in my driveway," says Liebenberg, who has trekked to Turkey, Zambia, China and Pukapuka, a remote island in the Pacific, to see past eclipses.

Students at a Hardin County elementary school will have access to a unique behavioral health program this fall. The program is a partnership between Meadow View Elementary and Communicare, a mental health clinic in the region.

The program will accept up to ten students who have severe mental or behavioral health problems. Raquel Strickland, manager for Communicare, said participating students will take their classes separately from other students for an average of nine weeks.

Clinton Lewis

The 10th president of Western Kentucky University, Dr. Timothy Caboni, is officially at the helm.  Caboni was sworn in Friday by Kentucky Chief Justice John Minton, Jr. during the quarterly meeting of the Board of Regents.

“Very few occasions are this special,” President Caboni said afterwards.  “I look forward to continuing the remarkable trajectory WKU is on as we go forward and working with all of our stakeholders.”

The oath of office was also administered to new Regent George Nichols III of Potomac, Maryland.  He was appointed to the Board by Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin earlier this month.

Creative Commons

A group of Kentuckians tasked with setting up a framework for charter schools to operate is officially down to work. 

The Charter Schools Advisory Council held its first meeting on Monday and began developing regulations on how to implement the alternative public schools.  One of the members is Dr. Gary Houchens, a professor at Western Kentucky University. 

"It's a lot of stringent oversight of the process, and I think both charter applicants and authorizers will be happy with the structures that we're putting into place," Houchens told WKU Public Radio.

University of Kentucky

A judge has ruled that former University of Kentucky board chairman Billy Joe Miles of Owensboro is competent to stand trial on rape and sodomy charges.

Defense attorney Scott Cox of Louisville told the Lexington Herald-Leader that special Circuit Judge Kelly Easton of Elizabethtown ruled Miles is competent for trial, which is set for Sept. 6.

Cox and other defense lawyers argued earlier that psychological examinations of the 77-year-old Miles had shown he wasn't mentally capable of going to trial. Neither Cox nor prosecutors in Attorney General Andy Beshear's office had comment Monday on the ruling.

J. Tyler Franklin

After more than a month of speculation, the U of L Foundation fired Chief Financial Officer Jason Tomlinson on Tuesday.

ULF Chair Diane Medley wouldn’t say whether Tomlinson was fired for cause or when the discussion to fire him began, but said his removal is effective immediately.

Tomlinson was put on leave after a blistering audit released last month alleged former university president James Ramsey and his administration purposefully overspent, hid information and made questionable governance decisions.

Simpson County Schools

Kentucky’s education commissioner is offering details of how regulators could measure public schools’ progress improving and educating students. The move comes after the legislature voted to overhaul the school accountability system this spring.

The new system would rate schools and districts on a scale from one to five “stars” based on how well they improve in six categories: proficiency, growth, graduation rates (for high schools), closing the achievement gap, transition readiness and opportunity and access.

Creative Commons

Efforts to repeal a controversial tax increase by Daviess County public schools have fallen short. 

School board members voted in May to levy a nickel tax to help fund construction of a new Daviess County Middle School and renovations to Apollo High School. 

Opponents failed to collect enough signatures on a petition by the June 30 deadline to force a special election to recall the tax.

The projects would cost a combined total of about $50 million.

WKU

Western Kentucky University President Timothy Caboni says the school can help fill local employment needs while also broadening the perspectives of its students.

Caboni’s first week as WKU President comes at a time when the state is putting increased pressure on colleges and universities to help address workforce development concerns.

Caboni says he wants WKU to prepare students to make a good living, while also preparing them to have a good life.

“I think that having that balance is important. That preparing people to go into the workforce and into a profession is key, but also ensuring they have the critical thinking and broader communication skills to be successful over a lifetime,” WKU’s 10th president said.

Caboni says one of his chief goals is for WKU to recruit “more and better” students who can graduate in four years. Degree productivity is a key point of Kentucky’s new performance-based funding model for higher education.

You can hear our full interview with Timothy Caboni here:


Pages