Education

An attempt to piggyback charter school legislation on another bill has likely killed two plans for education reform in Kentucky. The state Senate Education committee Thursday added language legalizing charter schools to a charter alternative plan sponsored by Representative Carl Rollins, who chairs the House Education Committee. Charter supporters hoped Rollins would allow the amendment in order to see his alternative become law, but it's unlikely the plan will work.

Kentucky lawmakers are trying again to raise the state's dropout age. Currently, students can drop out of school at 16 years old with parents' permission. But lawmakers and Governor Steve Beshear have pushed to raise the dropout age to 18, regardless of parental consent.

Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence

Citizens in ten communities across Kentucky will be participating Tuesday evening  in discussion groups and viewing a ninety minute movie titled, "American Teacher." The activity is sponsored by a number of advocacy groups, including the Kentucky Association for School Superintendents, the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, the Kentucky School Boards Association, and the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence. Organizers say they hope to spur discussion about the importance of placing and retaining excellent teachers in the classroom.

A proposal to create a scholarship fund for far eastern Kentucky college students could be in jeopardy. The Appalachian scholarship fund was intended as a compromise, after a measure to move the University of Pikeville into the state system couldn’t garner enough support. In the House’s version of the budget, lawmakers funded the scholarships with coal severance tax money.

A free exhibit called "Honoring our History Tour" will be on display at Slugger Field in Louisville Monday, and the  Kentucky Department of Veterans Affairs says donations will be accepted. According to Kentucky Department of Veterans Affairs Commissioner Ken Lucas, half of all donations collected at the site will go to the veterans cemetary in Radcliff.

LRC

Refugees would be allowed to remain in Kentucky high schools past their 21st birthday under a measure that has cleared the Kentucky House of Representatives. House Bill 183 is sponsored by Bowling Green Democrat Jody Richards, who says the proposal is intended to help refugees who have come to the United States to escape persecution in other countries.

Dr. Brian Fagan, Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Santa Barbara, will give a "Reach Week" lecture on the WKU campus on March 21st. Fagan is the author of the best selling book, "The Great Warming:Climate Change and the Rise and Fall of Civilizations." He has done extensive research on the ways civilization has adapted to climate change in the past.  His lecture in Van Meter Auditorium will be free and open to the public.   Dr. Fagan talks with Dan Modlin..........

WKU History Department

WKU History Professor John Hardin, who specializes in African American History, will appear tonight on the NBC television network program, "Who Do You Think You Are?"  Dr. Hardin helped to research the family history of former Pittsburgh Steeler running back Jerome Bettis, the family story that will be traced in tonight's program.  The story has roots in slavery in western Kentucky.  Dan Modlin has more.......

LRC

Lawmakers have reached a compromise on a proposal to create more educational opportunities in eastern Kentucky.

House Speaker Greg Stumbo has been advocating to move the University of Pikeville into the state university system. But that proposal doesn’t currently have the support to become reality, which forces supporters to adopt a compromise.

Given the potential of unusually severe weather this afternoon, the WKU Main and South Campuses will close at 12:30 p.m. today.  The Glasgow campus will close at 1 p.m. Central, and the Elizabethtown/Radcliff/Fort Knox campuses at 1 p.m. Eastern. We are awaiting a possible announcement from the Director of the Owensboro campus. 

Pages