education

Education
2:31 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Graduation Rates for Minority and Low-Income Kentucky Students Continue to Lag

Kentucky’s minority and low-income college students continue to graduate at lower rates than their peers.

In its upcoming annual accountability report, the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education is expected to show that while college graduation rates increased between 2011 and 2012, a significant gap in those rates persisted for underrepresented minority and low-income students.

Other highlights of the report include an uptick in college readiness, a decline in GED attainment and “lost ground” in the areas of college funding and affordability.

The council will release a finalized version of the report “in the near future.”

Education
11:38 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Study to Focus on Designing New Funding Model for Kentucky's Schools

A group representing nearly all of Kentucky's school districts is planning a study that could show lawmakers that school funding needs to be restored.

The Lexington Herald-Leader reports the Council for Better Education is raising money for the $130,000 study, which could begin Dec. 1.

Council president Tom Shelton says the study would design an equitable and adequate funding system to allow all students to become college- and career-ready.

The SEEK program, the primary source of money for school districts, has remained flat while schools have seen increases in the number of students and average daily attendance figures. That caused the amount of funding per student to slip from $3,866 in 2009 to $3,827 this year.

Flexible focus funds -- which include textbooks, preschool and staff development -- also have dropped.

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Education
11:35 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Bluegrass State Scores Above-Average Reading Results on "Nation's Report Card"

Kentucky has again posted above-average reading results in the latest release from the National Assessment of Educational Progress, known as the Nation’s Report Card.

This year, education officials are celebrating the inclusion of more special needs students than ever before.

The NAEP test gives a snapshot of 4th and 8th grade student performance in math and reading every two years. Kentucky has previously been criticized for excluding more students with special needs than schools the national average.

“The exclusion rates do have an impact on test scores, the more kids you exclude the higher your scores are going to be because most of the kids who are in that region of either being excluded or not being excluded are lower scoring students," said University of Virginia research professor David Grissmer, a member of the NAEP Validity Panel.

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Education
8:03 am
Thu October 24, 2013

Kentucky Taking Part in Pilot Project Aimed at Boosting Teach Training

Kentucky is among seven states that will participate in a two-year pilot program to improve teacher training programs.

The initiative was developed by the Council of Chief State School Officers and will help states reform the systems that guide what an educator should look like.

Robert Brown, executive director of Kentucky’s Education Professional Standards Board, says the network of participating states will allow Kentucky to develop new initiatives based on best practices

“You have to look beyond your borders. Even though we know we’re on the right track and we’re doing well, are there practices that will inform our work that will make us even better.”

The council has made recommendations to guide the states over the next two years. Brown says Kentucky has already begun to improve how it prepares teachers but says the program will allow the state to align its expectations to recent education reforms.

Education
11:49 am
Mon October 21, 2013

School Boards in Kentucky Increasing Local Property Taxes in Light of Funding Cuts

Nearly half of Kentucky’s 173 school districts have increased local property tax rates as much as possible.

The moves come in light of education cuts at both the state and federal levels. Kentucky School Boards Association spokesman Brad Hughes told the Courier-Journal that “districts have no choice” but to turn to local taxpayers in order to find increased funding.

Eighty-one districts in the state have adopted tax rates that will increase revenue by 4 percent. Under Kentucky law, that’s the largest property taxes can be increased without being subject to voter recall.

School officials who have increased local property tax rates say they’re still coming out on the short end despite making the move. The Estill County School Board will see an additional $65,000 from a tax increase approved this year. But officials there are quick to point out that the district's primary state appropriation is down nearly $700,000 compared to 2009.

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