Facebook

Updated at 12:52 p.m. ET

Cambridge Analytica used Facebook to find and target Americans to trigger paranoia and racial biases, a former employee of the data analytics company told lawmakers on Wednesday.

Kentucky was one of the states that contacted Facebook requesting information on how many residents have been affected by the recent privacy breach when Cambridge Analytica got access to the personal data of an estimated 87 million people.  Now the state numbers are in.

Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear is reporting that more than 1.3 million people in the state have been impacted by the Facebook data breach.

Beshear was one of a group of attorneys general who sent a letter to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg in March out of concern that personal information was provided without permission to Cambridge Analytica.

Kentucky residents who use Facebook are among 50 million people asking if their personal information is part of what may be a massive breach of privacy. Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear said  he’s trying to find out.

The British political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica got information on 50 million Facebook users apparently targeted to influence voters in the 2016 election.

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Mar 11, 2013

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An Indiana law that bans registered sex offenders from using Facebook and other social networking sites that can be accessed by children is unconstitutional, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday.

The 7th U.S. Circuit of Appeals in Chicago overturned a federal judge’s decision upholding the law, saying the state was justified in trying to protect children but that the “blanket ban” went too far by restricting free speech.

The 2008 law “broadly prohibits substantial protected speech rather than specifically targeting the evil of improper communications to minors,” the judges wrote.

If the past is any indication, Monday night's final presidential debate will saturate social media. Last week's face-off between President Obama and Mitt Romney generated more than 12 million comments on Facebook and Twitter.