Glasgow

Glasgow Independent Schools

Glasgow High School principal Keith Hale has been named superintendent of Glasgow Independent Schools. The Glasgow board of education made the announcement during a special called meeting Monday night.

Hale was one of three finalists for the job.

Board chair Amelia Kiser told the Glasgow Daily Times that Hale's "strength in the field of instruction,  his commitment to the district, his commitment to the kids of the district were all very attractive to us."

Hale told the newspaper he was honored by the appointment and getting it "absolutely means the world to me."

Creative Commons

The mayor of Glasgow is holding a news conference Friday afternoon to talk about concerns related to a local utility, according to the Daily Times.

The Glasgow Electric Plant Board’s rate structure charges customers much higher rates during one “peak” hour each month.

The EPB notifies customers through texts, phone calls, and television announcements ahead of days when the peak hour is likely to occur. Some citizens have complained that the new rate structure is unfair to those who need to run air-conditioning during the hottest days of the summer, and can’t afford the higher costs.

Mayor Dick Doty has invited the public to attend the news conference at 2 pm Friday in the City Council chambers.

In the interest of disclosure, the Glasgow EPB is an underwriter with WKU Public Radio.

Rhonda Miller

Gardening season at one Kentucky jail means more than the physical and mental refreshment that comes with digging, planting and enjoying fresh vegetables. 

A Western Kentucky University sociology course is bringing students from the Glasgow campus to dig side-by-side with students who are inmates at the detention center. More than asparagus and potatoes are taking root at the jail garden.

Some of the students are growing new lives.  

Two dozen college students recently shoveled a mountain of mulch into wheelbarrows at the Barren County Detention Center. They could be any group of college students enrolled in this hands-on course from Western Kentucky University called The Sociology of Agriculture and Food. But five of the young women are wearing bright orange T-shirts .

They’re the inmates.

Glasgow Independent Schools

Glasgow Police have made two arrests in connection with a Wednesday shooting incident.

Twenty-three year old Jaleel Wood was arrested at his workplace Thursday night and charged with attempted murder and two counts of first-degree wanton endangerment.

Twenty-seven-year-old Mary Ash was charged with attempted murder after turning herself into police Friday morning.

Both Wood and Ash are from Glasgow.

Police have an arrest warrant issued for 22-year old Anthony Wood of Glasgow, and are actively searching for him.

Three Glasgow city schools were placed on a soft lockdown Wednesday after 911 callers reported passengers in two cars exchanging gunfire.

No one was injured, and the lockdown was quickly lifted.

Glasgow Independent Schools

Three Glasgow city schools were placed on a soft lockdown Wednesday afternoon after police received calls about passengers in two vehicles exchanging gunfire.

Several callers to 911 said the gunfire took place on Columbia Avenue, not far from Glasgow High School, Middle School, and Highland Elementary.

No students were harmed.

Police were not able to locate the vehicles, but recovered evidence from the scene of the shooting.

The vehicles believed to be involved in the incident are a black Ford Crown Victoria, and a goldor tan Chevy Malibu.

Investigators are asking anyone with information about the shooting to contact the Glasgow Police Department, at 270-651-5151.

The former Glasgow police chief is suing the city and the interim chief.

Guy Turcotte stepped down from the police chief position at the end of 2014 and was appointed to another post within the department by then-Mayor Rhonda Riherd Trautman. Her successor, Dick Doty, appointed officer James Duff as interim police chief, with a search currently underway for a permanent successor.

The Glasgow Daily-Times reports that Turcotte claims in his suit that he has been subjected to unfounded criticism, micromanagement, harassment, and belittlement. Turcotte claims that despite being one of the highest-paid officers on the force, he has been treated like a “rookie police officer.”

A statement released by Glasgow city attorney Rich Alexander said the city welcomed the scrutiny that will now be placed on Turcotte’s employment history, and that the former police chief will "be required to explain his actions and conduct relative to the Glasgow Police Department.”

"The city is confident in its position and perhaps these recurring issues will be finally resolved and the police department can then get on with the business of protecting and serving its citizens," the statement concluded.

Six candidates are under consideration to be the next Glasgow Police Chief.

The candidates were selected by a search committee from a pool of 20 applications. Glasgow Mayor Dick Doty said in a news release that background checks will be conducted, and the committee will contact the candidates’ references.

If no problems arise, the six candidates will be brought in for interviews.

The candidate pool contains both in-state and out-of-state candidates. Doty is asking Glasgow residents to submit written input on the qualities they would like to see in the next police chief by the close of business on Friday, May 29.

Kevin Willis

It’s the time of year when animal shelters across the state become inundated with kittens.

Margie Patton, with the Barren River Animal Welfare Association in Glasgow, says many in the shelter community come to dread the spring and summer months because of the number of cats that are dropped off.

She says it’s a problem that could be largely solved by increased spaying and neutering.

“Most people don’t realize that female cats can get pregnant when they’re four or five months old, and so often people come in and they’ve had this surprise litter,” Patton says. “So we’re trying to encourage people to spay or neuter their cats before they’re four months of age.”

According to Patton, BRAWA has made solid gains in recent years in the number of dogs it’s been able to match with new owners. But the ability of cats to procreate at such a prolific level makes it nearly impossible for the shelter to handle the number of felines that are dropped off.

“They can have three litters a year, four litters a year. The females will stay in heat and just keep having kittens. We’ve had some who were in here to get spayed, who had eight-week old kittens, and they were already pregnant again.”

Patton says many kind-hearted people feed stray cats in their communities. She suggest bringing those strays to the shelter to be spayed or neutered is an even better idea, because it’s much easier to find a home for one cat, as opposed to a litter of kittens.

The city of Glasgow is receiving federal funding to improve transportation options in part of  the community. The Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) is providing $776,815 to expand residential sidewalks and the city’s shared-use path in the Carnation Drive neighborhood.

The goal is to increase the opportunities for residents to walk or bike to grocery stores, parks, and businesses. A proposed pedestrian bridge would link the neighborhood to the South Fork Creek Path, providing a direct connection to the west that’s currently unobtainable because of the wide span of the creek.

Glasgow Mayor Rhonda Trautman says many details still need to be worked out.

“We’re in the initial phase,” Trautman said. “We’ll have a design phase to complete, and then we’ll get items and services procured. It won't be quick, because federal money has a lot of rules and regulations. I’m hoping by late fall we’ll have our plan ready to go.”

TAP provides funding for communities that is used for transportation improvements, such as pedestrian and biking pathways, scenic routes, and beautification. The city of Glasgow is expected to commit $194,204 in local funding toward the project.

Judge Rules Ex-Deputy Violated Rights of Detainee

Jul 16, 2014
Kentucky Department of Corrections

A federal judge has ruled that a former Barren County sheriff's deputy violated the constitutional rights of a man under arrest. U.S. District Judge Joseph McKinley found that Adam Minor used excessive force on Billy Stinnett after a 2010 chase.

The decision is the latest in the long-running case involving former Barren County sheriff Chris Eaton and other officials.

Stinnett claimed in a civil suit filed in federal court in 2011 that Eaton, Minor and other officers struck him or failed to intervene when others struck him after he was arrested.

A Barren County man wanted for the murder of his wife has been arrested in another state. Glasgow Police say John Amis was taken into custody Friday by law enforcement in Clermont County, Ohio. 

Amis is charged in the death of 37-year-old Lorine LaBombard. According to police, Amis called 911 on June 16 stating that he was en route to TJ Samson Hospital with his wife who was unresponsive due to a possible drug overdose. 

LaBombard was declared dead by hospital staff. The coroner of Barren County later contacted police after discovering multiple bruises and injuries to her body that suggested possible foul play. An autopsy ruled out an overdose as the cause of death, but rather blunt force trauma.

Once Amis is returned to Barren County, his bond will be set $1 million.

A south-central Kentucky doctor has been charged with prescribing pain medications outside of her professional practice, resulting in the death of a patient.

A federal grand jury in Bowling Green indicted Dr. Clella Hayes of Glasgow on Wednesday. Hayes is charged with issuing and authorizing prescriptions for fentanyl, morphine, oxycodone, Demerol, hydrocodone, Cheratussin and Valium over a five-year period.

The grand jury also alleged that Hayes gave the painkiller fentanyl to a patient in 2011, causing the patient to die.

Hayes was arrested Wednesday.

Hayes is listed among the family practitioners at Monroe County Medical Center in Tompkinsville. Court records did not list an attorney for Hayes. A message left for Hayes and hospital administrators was not immediately returned Wednesday afternoon.

Video: 2014 Highland Games

Jun 3, 2014

The Highland Games take place at the end of every spring in Glasgow, KY. People from all over the region, as well as around the world, gather to wear kilts, listen to bagpipe troupes perform, trace their Celtic lineage, watch and participate in games such as ax throwing and tug-of-war. 

T.J. Samson

T.J. Samson Community Hospital in Glasgow announced Wednesday that it will cut between 39 and 49 employees from all departments beginning immediately. The hospital released the news at a news conference in Glasgow.

The Bowling Green Daily News reports interim CEO Henry Royse said the difficult decisions were based on a costly roll out of an inadequate financial software program and the impact of the Affordable Care Act. Besides the staff layoffs, senior management and salaried physicians will have their pay cut by 10% and employees making more than $10 an hour will see reductions of 2% to 6% beginning in September.

Despite the decisions that the hospital was faced with, the administration claims to be still encouraged by the hospital's future. The cuts won't impact the quality or access to care "that drives nearly 1,200 employees of T.J. Samson every day," according to a news release.

This latest news comes after the non-profit hospital offered employees early retirement last year. At least two dozen people, including then CEO Bill Kindred, accepted that offer.

The city of Glasgow has taken another step toward limiting the impact of methane gas released from its landfill.

Governor Steve Beshear was in Barren County Wednesday to present Glasgow city leaders with a $100,000 grant from the state to pursue a landfill gas generation project.

Currently, methane emitted from garbage at local landfills is vented into the atmosphere. Under the new plan, methane would be piped into a generator and converted into electricity.

“This methane gas to electricity process is something we need to do more of in this country," Beshear said. "And to take refuge in a landfill, and take the methane gas off of that and turn it into electricity and put it on the grid so that people can use it--it saves us all money, it saves the environment.”

Glasgow mayor Rhonda Trautman says the city is acting now to avoid problems later.

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