A Kentucky lawmaker has deleted a Thanksgiving Tweet over concerns it may be misinterpreted as a joke about Native American genocide.

In response to comments on gun control made by New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Kentucky Rep. Brian Linder, a Republican from Dry Ridge, tweeted Friday that “If the Pilgrims had gun control, we wouldn’t have Thanksgiving.”

Linder explained to Kentucky Public Radio that the joke was about gun control preventing pilgrims from hunting turkeys.

“Thanksgiving is, you know, traditionally you have turkey, and so what I meant was you wouldn’t be able to have turkey. I know see that it, I could see where people have misunderstood what I meant.”

Louisville Rep. Reginald Meeks, who is part Cherokee, doesn't believe it. He called Linder’s comments” beyond offensive” and said they represent an ignorance of American history.

A bill is gaining steam in Tennessee that would allow teachers and other staff members with a background in policing to carry guns in schools. The Tennessean reports the measure is a compromise between those who want all teachers to be allowed to carry guns, and those who want to increase the number of armed security guards in Volunteer State schools.

The bill would allow school personnel who have worked as police officers to get certification allowing them to bring their weapons to work. Gov. Bill Haslam backs the plan, saying it strikes a good balance between cost considerations, school safety, and local control.

House Bill 6 is moving its way through legislative committees in Nashville and could reach the floors of the state House and Senate before the session adjourns next week.

Concealed Gun Classes Skyrocket in Kentucky

Mar 12, 2013

The number of firearm training certificates issued to residents who wish to carry a concealed gun in Kentucky jumped to its highest number in a decade in the month of January, state officials said.

The issued certificates spiked from 4,355 in December to 12,685 in January, The Courier-Journal reported.

The Kentucky Department of Criminal Justice training said the number declined to 8,677 in February, but it was still at least double that of any month last year, aside from December. The training is required to receive a concealed carry license, which allows Kentuckians to carry a weapon out of sight under their clothing in public.

Faith Yount recently took a class at Open Range in Crestwood. After inheriting guns when her father died, the 38-year-old decided to get a license to protect herself and because "you don't know what will happen" with gun control.

Murray State University has changed its policy for guns on campus to require everyone but uniformed personnel to leave weapons inside their cars. The move made last week came in the wake of a Kentucky Supreme Court decision in April saying the University of Kentucky improperly fired student from an on-campus job for having a gun in his car.