health care

Creative Commons

Ever wanted to find the cheapest price for a surgery but had no luck accessing information?

There’s a plan to change that in Kentucky, and it’s currently under consideration by the administration of Gov. Matt Bevin, which must give the green light to build a health care cost comparison website for the state.

This week, Kentucky earned an F on the 2016 Report Card on State Price Transparency Laws, an annual report released by the independent health policy organizations Health Care Incentives Improvement Institute and Catalyst for Payment Reform.

Kentucky’s main offense? Not having the database or a consumer website.

“Do you think it’s OK that a mom and her husband will have to pay an excess of $2,000 based on random selection of hospitals to deliver their baby?” said Francois de Brantes, executive director of the Health Care Incentives Improvement Institute.

The Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky is hoping a new five-year grant program will reduce the spread of chronic diseases in Kentucky. The foundation will give three million dollars to ten different communities to help fight illnesses among children. Targeted maladies include cancer, diabetes and heart disease, all of which are prevalent in the commonwealth.

As Kentucky officials continue to implement the provisions of the Affordable Care Act, doctors are preparing for a rush of new patients in every sector of the health care industry. Seven Counties Services CEO Tony Zipple says at least 25 percent of uninsured Americans have behavioral issues that need attention. And once the Affordable Care Act takes effect, he's expecting to see a flood of newly-insured patients seeking treatments.

A new Courier-Journal Bluegrass poll shows a near majority of Kentuckians oppose President Obama’s health care law, with a clear majority against the mandate requiring Americans to buy health insurance or pay a fine. But that same poll indicates overwhelming support for several key parts of the Affordable Care Act.

Owensboro Medical Health System plans to raze part of its existing facilities as it prepares to open a new hospital next year. OMHS will continue to use four of its existing buildings, including the Mitchell Cancer Center, the Breckenridge medical office building, the emergency department building, and a parking garage.

Governor Steve Beshear has followed through on his promise to set up a state-run health insurance exchange in Kentucky. The Affordable Care Act requires states to set up marketplaces in which residents can buy private insurance or sign up for Medicaid.