health care

J. Tyler Franklin, WFPL

U.S. Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky appears to have notched a victory in the health care debate in Washington. 

A published report says President Trump will sign an executive order allowing Americans to purchase health insurance across state lines. 

Senator Paul has been a staunch advocate for association health plans which would allow small businesses to pool together across state lines through their membership in a trade or professional group to purchase health coverage for their employees and their families.

Kentucky’s Republican U.S. Senators are on opposite sides in the latest attempt to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. 

The bill by Senators Lindsey Graham and Bill Cassidy would give block grants to states to create their own health care systems.  The funding would replace Obamacare's tax credits and Medicaid expansion.  The measure would also repeal the individual and employer mandates. 

Speaking on the Senate floor, Kentucky Senator and Majority Leader Mitch McConnell praised the legislation for taking more decision-making power out of Washington.

McConnell to Consider Bipartisan Plan to Pay Health Insurers

Aug 5, 2017
Ryland Barton

A week after an attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act failed, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says he'd consider a bipartisan effort to continue payments to insurers to avert a costly rattling of health insurance markets.

McConnell told reporters Saturday there is "still a chance" the Senate could revive the measure to repeal and replace "Obamacare," but he acknowledged the window for that is rapidly closing.

The Kentucky senator noted Republican Sen. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee is working on "some kind of bipartisan approach" that would involve subsidies for insurance companies.

Flickr/Creative Commons

A new report out from the left-leaning Commonwealth Fund finds more than 32,000 jobs could be lost in Kentucky by 2026 if the U.S. Senate passes its proposal to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. Most of those jobs would be in healthcare, but the report found other fields, like real estate, could also be hit.

The Congressional Budget Office estimates nationwide, 22 million fewer people would have insurance under the Senate’s Better Care Reconciliation Act. Insurance costs for some people–like older people and those living in rural areas–would increase.

NPR

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has rejected President Donald Trump’s advice to nix the GOP’s complex health care proposal in favor of a bill that would simply get rid of “Obamacare” once and for all.

McConnell told reporters after an event Friday in his home state of Kentucky that the Republican health care bill remains challenging but “we are going to stick with that path” in response to a question about the president’s tweet. Former President Barack Obama signed the Affordable Care Act into law in 2010, and Republicans have been trying to get rid of it ever since.

Updated at 8:10 pm ET

Congressional forecasters say a Senate bill that aims to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act would leave 22 million more people uninsured by 2026.

That's only slightly fewer uninsured than a version passed by the House in May.

WFPL

U.S. Senator Rand Paul says his chamber has a chance to “fix Obamacare after the House didn’t.” 

The Bowling Green Republican and ophthalmologist says the health care plan approved by Republican colleagues in the U.S. House falls short of keeping his party’s promises to lower prices and provide better coverage. 

Paul held a roundtable discussion Monday with members of the Houchens Insurance Group in Bowling Green.  The event was closed to the media, but Paul said afterwards that a health care solution must empower the consumer.

"What I worry about is the local plumber, carpenter, or farmer that works for themselves.  They worry that if they or their spouse gets sick, then all of a sudden their rates will go up," Paul stated.  "If you have to buy insurance by yourself, I'd like to let you join a group like a buying co-op so you can get lower prices."

Creative Commons

Ever wanted to find the cheapest price for a surgery but had no luck accessing information?

There’s a plan to change that in Kentucky, and it’s currently under consideration by the administration of Gov. Matt Bevin, which must give the green light to build a health care cost comparison website for the state.

This week, Kentucky earned an F on the 2016 Report Card on State Price Transparency Laws, an annual report released by the independent health policy organizations Health Care Incentives Improvement Institute and Catalyst for Payment Reform.

Kentucky’s main offense? Not having the database or a consumer website.

“Do you think it’s OK that a mom and her husband will have to pay an excess of $2,000 based on random selection of hospitals to deliver their baby?” said Francois de Brantes, executive director of the Health Care Incentives Improvement Institute.

The Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky is hoping a new five-year grant program will reduce the spread of chronic diseases in Kentucky. The foundation will give three million dollars to ten different communities to help fight illnesses among children. Targeted maladies include cancer, diabetes and heart disease, all of which are prevalent in the commonwealth.

As Kentucky officials continue to implement the provisions of the Affordable Care Act, doctors are preparing for a rush of new patients in every sector of the health care industry. Seven Counties Services CEO Tony Zipple says at least 25 percent of uninsured Americans have behavioral issues that need attention. And once the Affordable Care Act takes effect, he's expecting to see a flood of newly-insured patients seeking treatments.

A new Courier-Journal Bluegrass poll shows a near majority of Kentuckians oppose President Obama’s health care law, with a clear majority against the mandate requiring Americans to buy health insurance or pay a fine. But that same poll indicates overwhelming support for several key parts of the Affordable Care Act.

Owensboro Medical Health System plans to raze part of its existing facilities as it prepares to open a new hospital next year. OMHS will continue to use four of its existing buildings, including the Mitchell Cancer Center, the Breckenridge medical office building, the emergency department building, and a parking garage.

Governor Steve Beshear has followed through on his promise to set up a state-run health insurance exchange in Kentucky. The Affordable Care Act requires states to set up marketplaces in which residents can buy private insurance or sign up for Medicaid.