Matt Bevin

Ryland Barton

Justices on Kentucky’s Supreme Court heard arguments over whether Gov. Matt Bevin had the right to overhaul the University of Louisville board of trustees last year under a law that gives the governor power to reshape state boards while the legislature isn’t in session.

J. Tyler Franklin

Gov. Matt Bevin and Attorney General Andy Beshear will square off before the Kentucky Supreme Court on Friday in a case dealing with how much power the governor has to reshape state university boards.

Bevin has appealed a lower court’s ruling that he didn’t have the authority to overhaul the University of Louisville board of trustees.

Bevin abolished U of L’s governing board lats year, severing the four-year terms of the 15 appointed members of the panel, which he called “dysfunctional.”

J. Tyler Franklin

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell condemned white supremacists who are gearing up for a rally in Lexington in response to plans to remove statues of Confederate generals from city property.

“We can have no tolerance for an ideology of racial hatred,” McConnell said in a statement. “There are no good neo-nazis, and those who espouse their views are not supporters of American ideals and freedoms. We all have a responsibility to stand against hate and violence, wherever it raises its evil head.”

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Kentucky taxpayers could get their first glimpse of a projected budget shortfall in 2018.

State economists are scheduled to meet Friday to adopt planning estimates for the current fiscal year plus the next four fiscal years. Kentucky finished the 2017 fiscal year on June 30 with a $138 million shortfall. Budget Director John Chilton has warned the state is likely headed for another shortfall in 2018.

Alexandra Kanik

An emerging debate about whether elected officials violate people’s free speech rights by blocking them on social media is spreading across the U.S. as groups sue or warn politicians to stop the practice.

The American Civil Liberties Union this week sued Maine Gov. Paul LePage and sent warning letters to Utah’s congressional delegation. It followed recent lawsuits against the governors of Maryland and Kentucky and President Donald Trump.

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A judge says Attorney General Andy Beshear’s fourth lawsuit against Gov. Matt Bevin can proceed, recognizing that any ruling in the case will likely be appealed.

This particular challenge deals with Bevin’s executive order from earlier this summer that reorganized several education boards using a little-known state law. This law has also been used by previous governors but never challenged in court.

Franklin Circuit Court Judge Thomas Wingate converted Bevin’s request to dismiss the case into a motion for summary judgement, meaning the challenge won’t go to trial and will have an expedited ruling.

Kentucky's Top Elected Officials Prepare to Meet in Court

Aug 9, 2017
J. Tyler Franklin

Two of Kentucky's most bitter rivals will meet in court twice over the next 10 days in legal battles that could help shape the state's future in both politics and policy.

Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear has sued Republican Gov. Matt Bevin four times over his use of executive orders to reshape state government. Beshear has been victorious in one of those lawsuits, while the others are still pending.

On Wednesday, Bevin's attorneys will ask a judge to dismiss the latest lawsuit that challenges the governor's order to remake several boards that govern public education.

Erica Peterson

A Maysville woman who died while trying to save her children from a house fire and a man who rescued a truck driver from a burning vehicle were honored in a ceremony Monday in Frankfort.

Lori Kearney and Lou Scharold were awarded the national Carnegie Hero Medal during the ceremony hosted by Gov. Matt Bevin. The award recognizes people “who risk their lives to an extraordinary degree saving or attempting to save the lives of others.” According to Bevin’s office, more than 150 Kentuckians have earned the honor since it was established by industrialist Andrew Carnegie in 1904.

Stu Johnson

Kentucky’s governor says there’s some question about the agenda for a special legislative session he plans to call this fall.

Governor Matt Bevin participated in the annual Shaping Our Appalachian Region Summit Friday. 

Following the formal ceremony, he said he still intends to call lawmakers to Frankfort in the coming weeks to tackle pension reforms. 

Bevin says now may not be the time to address tax reform issues.

Ryland Barton

The Fancy Farm Picnic kicks off Saturday in Graves County in far-west Kentucky. The annual political speaking event takes place in the afternoon, drawing politicians and barbecue lovers from around the state.

Before a Democratic dinner Friday evening, Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear stoked the flames of an ongoing feud with Republican Gov. Matt Bevin.

Beshear said he had alerted federal authorities about a house Bevin purchased from a political donor and state contractor.

J. Tyler Franklin

Gov. Matt Bevin has won an appeal over the official value of his mansion on the outskirts of Louisville.

The governor had appealed the official assessment after the Courier-Journal first reported that Bevin paid nearly $1 million less for the property than the county’s estimate of its worth.
Now, the Jefferson County Board of Assessment Appeals says that Bevin’s house and surrounding property is worth $2.15 million instead of the $2.97 million value originally set by the Jefferson County Property Valuation Administrator.

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A former dentistry professor says members of Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration pressured University of Kentucky officials to fire him after he wrote a critique of the governor’s plan to reshape the state’s Medicaid system.

Dr. Raynor Mullins, who worked at UK for more than 40 years, filed the suit in federal court against UK Healthcare Vice President Mark Birdwhistell, UK College of Dentistry Dean Stephanos Kyrkanides and an unknown member of Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration listed as “John Doe.”

J. Tyler Franklin

As Gov. Matt Bevin’s mansion was inspected Tuesday by a board that will determine how much it’s worth, the governor lashed out on Twitter at reporters covering the meeting.

The value of Bevin’s home, located in the outskirts of Louisville, has been scrutinized in recent months after the Courier-Journal first reported he paid significantly less than the official estimate of the property’s value for the mansion and surrounding 10 acres.

Bevin bought the home for $1.6 million from Neil Ramsey, an investment manager and political donor whom the governor appointed to the Kentucky Retirement Systems board of trustees.

J. Tyler Frankin

The ACLU of Kentucky is suing Gov. Matt Bevin for blocking people on Facebook and Twitter, saying the governor is violating the free speech rights of his constituents.

The challenge was filed on behalf of two Kentucky residents who say they have been “permanently blocked from engaging in political speech” on the governor’s official social media pages.

J. Tyler Franklin

The ACLU has asked Kentucky's Republican governor to stop blocking people from following his social media accounts.

The Courier-Journal reports the ACLU sent a letter to Gov. Matt Bevin on July 11 telling him that by blocking people from following his social media accounts, he is violating their rights of free speech under the state and federal constitutions. The newspaper had previously reported Bevin had blocked roughly 600 accounts from his official Facebook and Twitter pages. Blocking an account limits that person's ability to see Bevin's posts or to engage with him.

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