Matt Bevin

Jacob Ryan

Gov. Matt Bevin says that he’s opposed to removing Confederate monuments from public property, calling it a “sanitization of history.”

The statement comes days after violence in Charlottesville, Virginia stemming from a white nationalist protest of that city’s plans to remove a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee.

“I absolutely disagree with this sanitization of history,” Bevin said in an interview on WVHU radio in Huntington, West Virginia.

J. Tyler Franklin

Adding to Kentucky’s financial woes, economists are predicting the state will bring in around $200 million less than originally projected this fiscal year.

The state’s Consensus Forecasting Group, a panel of economists that budget writers rely on to estimate how much money the state will make, predicted Kentucky will bring in a little more than $10.6 billion in revenue instead of the more than $10.8 billion initially estimated.

J. Tyler Franklin, WFPL

Gov. Matt Bevin has restored the rights to vote and hold public office for 284 Kentuckians with felony criminal records, though he says the action is pending background checks by the state Justice Cabinet.

State law strips people convicted of felonies of their civil rights to vote, run for office, serve on a jury and own firearms.

Governors have the power to restore these rights to people with felony records by issuing pardons for the convictions.

J. Tyler Franklin

Weeks after announcing a prayer initiative in response to an increase in violent crime in west Louisville, Gov. Matt Bevin is criticizing those who responded negatively to his proposal.

“Those who hate God and hate this administration were happy to mock that,” Bevin said in an interview on WHAS’ Leland Conway show.

Bevin held a meeting with spiritual leaders at a middle school in west Louisville earlier this month. He asked attendees to organize prayer groups to walk the blocks of three West End ZIP codes several times a week for a year.

Kentucky Governor Says House Is Worth $1.6 Million

Jun 7, 2017
J. Tyler Frankin

The family home that Kentucky’s Republican governor purchased from a friend and political appointee is worth $1.3 million less than local officials say it is, according to the governor’s lengthy appeal to tax assessors in his county.

The appeal is Gov. Matt Bevin’s first detailed account of the purchase that has prompted two ethics complaints and captivated Kentucky’s political circles in the months since The Courier-Journal first wrote about the sale. If it succeeds, the appeal could quash the ethics complaints and arm Bevin with a defense against charges of corruption that Democrats are sure to level at him when he runs for re-election in 2019.

Bevin: Special Session Will Happen After Aug. 15

Jun 6, 2017
Alix Mattingly

Kentucky's Republican governor says a special session of the state legislature will happen after Aug. 15.

The state legislature adjourned for the year in April. But Gov. Matt Bevin has said he will call them back for a special session to overhaul the state's tax code and public pension system.

Tuesday, Bevin sent a letter to all 138 members of the General Assembly and told them he does not plan to call a special session before Aug. 15 "out of respect to our families and summer schedules."

Becca Schimmel

Kentucky’s Attorney General Andy Beshear said the state’s new right-to-work law is an example of misplaced priorities. In a recent visit to Western Kentucky University, he said the law won’t lead to the job creation its supporters are seeking.

 

Supporters of right-to-work say it will help Kentucky compete against other states for new jobs.

 

Right to work allows employees to work in unionized facilities without paying union dues. Unions are still legally responsible for collectively bargaining for all employees, and defending all employees in the event of a grievance. Beshear believes right-to-work is bad policy.

 

“I wanted to be Attorney General to better protect families, and all right-to-work does is pay our working families less,” Beshear said.

 

Beshear pointed out Kentucky won Site Selection magazine’s “Governor’s Cup” award for its number of capital investment projects in both 2014 and 2015. The Attorney General said that shows the state was capable of competing for jobs and industry without right-to-work.

Kentucky LRC

GOP state Representative David Floyd declined an appointment to a special committee to investigate Republican Gov. Matt Bevin.

Floyd was one of two Republicans placed on the committee by Kentucky House Speaker Greg Stumbo, a Democrat.  

The committee is assigned to look into whether Bevin broke the law when he tried to convince some Democratic lawmakers to switch parties.  

In a letter to Stumbo, Floyd said he must decline the appointment because of "pressing family concerns."

Becca Schimmel

Attorney General Andy Beshear is commending victims of sexual assault for stepping forward and reporting what happened to them. He spoke in Bowling Green Wednesday about the backlog of 3,000 untested rape kits in Kentucky. Beshear said everything must be done to get the kits tested as soon as possible.

“These are not a box on a shelf, they represent a victim of one of the most heinous crimes imaginable that had the courage to report an underreported crime,” Beshear said.

Beshear’s office recently transferred $4.5 million from a pharmaceutical settlement to the Kentucky State Police crime lab. The Attorney General said the funding should ensure that there’s never a backlog of untested rape kits again.

J. Tyler Franklin

Days after a judge temporarily blocked Gov. Matt Bevin’s overhaul of the University of Louisville board of trustees, Bevin said it would “tarnish the reputation” of the school if the old version of the board meets later this week.

The governor’s office has argued that the overhaul was necessary to bring the board in alignment with state law that requires the board to reflect the racial and political makeup in the state. The board had too many Democrats and too few racial minorities before the revamp, according to state law.

“A meeting of an illegally constituted board would only further tarnish the reputation of this outstanding university,” Bevin said in a statement. “It would clearly show that those who insist upon this course of action are not truly interested in the best interests of the University of Louisville.

Attorney General Andy Beshear is suing the governor for abolishing the old 17-member board and replacing it with a new 10-member panel. On Thursday, Franklin Circuit Court Judge Phillip Shepherd temporarily blocked the new board from meeting until the lawsuit is resolved.