NPR News

NPR News
6:49 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Egypt Begins Dangerous New Phase As Interim Leader Steps In

People dance and cheer in Cairo's Tahrir Square on July 4, the day after former Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi was ousted from power.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 10:09 pm

  • From 'Morning Edition': Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson in Cairo
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NPR News
2:21 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Egypt's President Morsi Is Ousted From Power By Military

Protesters gather at Tahrir Square. Morsi remained defiant as the military pressed the president and his political opponents to strike a compromise.
Amr Nabil AP

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 6:27 am

(Click here for most recent update: 7 p.m. ET.)

A huge celebration has begun in Egypt's Tahrir Square, after army chief Gen. Abdel Fattah al-Sisi proclaimed that Mohammed Morsi is out as president and the country's constitution has been suspended. The new plan calls for Egypt's chief justice to lead an interim government and set a date for early presidential elections.

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NPR News
10:23 am
Sun June 30, 2013

'Furious' EU Demands Answers After New Report Of NSA Spying

European Union flags fly in front of the organization's headquarters in Brussels.
Wu Wei Xinhua/Landov

"Senior European Union officials are outraged by revelations that the U.S. spied on EU representations in Washington and New York," Germany's Der Spiegel writes. "Some have called for a suspension of talks on the trans-Atlantic free trade agreement."

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NPR News
11:02 am
Wed June 26, 2013

After DOMA: What's Next For Gay Married Couples

Edith Windsor is mobbed by journalists and supporters as she leaves the Supreme Court on March 27, when the court heard oral arguments in the case that challenged the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 2:47 pm

The Supreme Court's 5-4 decision Wednesday to overturn the Defense of Marriage Act is a monumental victory for advocates of same-sex marriage.

But what happens now that the 1996 federal law that confines marriage to a man and a woman has been declared unconstitutional?

Will federal benefits flow only to same-sex married couples living in states that recognize their unions?

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NPR News
9:14 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Court Overturns DOMA, Sidesteps Broad Gay Marriage Ruling

Plaintiff Edith Windsor of New York waves to supporters in front of the Supreme Court in Washington after the court heard arguments on her Defense of Marriage Act case.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 2:51 am

The Supreme Court issued rulings on two highly-anticipated cases on gay marriage today. By 5-4, it ruled the federal Defense of Marriage Act, which defines marriage as a union between one man and one woman, is unconstitutional.

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NPR News
7:36 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

Senate Adds Border Security Measure To Immigration Bill

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 7:51 pm

The Senate has taken another step toward approving a sweeping immigration overhaul bill, as the legislation passed an essential test Monday evening. By a vote of 67-27, the chamber voted to include an amendment on border security to the final bill.

The margin of the vote means the measure cannot be the target of a filibuster. The Hill reports:

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NPR News
11:10 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Supreme Court Sends Affirmative Action Case Back To Lower Court

Abigail Noel Fisher, who challenged a racial component to University of Texas at Austin's admissions policy, speaks to the media outside the U.S. Supreme Court building during oral in the case in October.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 7:39 pm

One of the Supreme Court's most anticipated cases of its current term — a challenge to the University of Texas' affirmative action admissions process — has ended with a ruling that does not revisit the fundamental issue of whether such programs discriminate against whites.

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NPR News
7:12 am
Sun June 23, 2013

Ecuador Says NSA Leaker Has Asked For Asylum

A TV screen shows a news report of Edward Snowden at a shopping mall in Hong Kong on Sunday.
Vincent Yu Associated Press

Originally published on Sun June 23, 2013 4:20 pm

(This story was last updated at 5:17 p.m. ET)

Edward Snowden, the former NSA contractor accused of leaking classified surveillance information, has asked Ecuador for asylum, the country's foreign minister says.

Snowden left Hong Kong earlier Sunday bound for a "third country," the government in the Asian hub said. He later landed in Moscow.

Ecuadorian Foreign Minister Ricardo Patino Aroca, who is on an official visit to Vietnam, said:

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NPR News
7:47 pm
Sat June 22, 2013

Facebook Bug Exposed Contact Information Stored On Profiles

Facebook has admitted to a bug that exposed millions of users' contact information inadvertently.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 1:02 pm

Facebook has discovered a bug that compromised contact information for millions of people. The company estimates that about 6 million users had email addresses or telephone numbers inadvertently shared with others they have a connection to.

CNN explains how the accidental sharing occurred:

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NPR News
8:36 am
Sat June 22, 2013

Snowden Extradition Could Get Snarled In Hong Kong Courts

A banner shows support for Edward Snowden, in Hong Kong on Monday.
Philippe Lopez AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 7:52 pm

Updated at 4:50 p.m. ET

National Security Advisor Tom Donilon tells CBS News that Washington has asked Hong Kong to turn over NSA leaker Edward Snowden under the terms of a 1998 extradition treaty between the two governments.

"Hong Kong has been a historically good partner of the United States in law enforcement matters and we expect them to comply with the treaty in this case," Donilon said.

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