Al Drago/CQ-Roll Call Inc.

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

The bill is an amalgam of more than a dozen proposals passed through the year in the House and Senate. And while it has lots of new policies and provisions — from creating a task force to study how best to treat pain, to encouraging states to create prescription drug monitoring programs — it doesn't have much money to put them in place.

President Obama had requested $1.1 billion to help pay for more addiction treatment programs and other initiatives. But the version agreed to by House and Senate Republicans last week didn't include all that money. In the end, it will probably get about half that much.

"It's clear that efforts to prevent and treat the opioid epidemic will fall short without additional investments," Sen. Patty Murray, D-Washington, said in a statement after House and Senate negotiators hammered out the final bill.

Report: Kentucky Drug Overdose Deaths Rose in 2014

Jul 15, 2015

A new report shows the number of people who died from drug overdoses in Kentucky jumped 7 percent last year while the number of deaths attributed to heroin stayed about the same.

The Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy issued the report Wednesday and said it illustrates the persistent challenge the state faces in combating drug abuse.

Louisville had the most overdose deaths with 204, an increase of 12 from 2013. Floyd County in eastern Kentucky had the highest number of overdose deaths per 100,000 people with 55.1.

Autopsies from the Kentucky Medical Examiner's office indicate the majority of people who died had multiple drugs in their system. Morphine accounted for the most deaths, showing up in more than 40 percent of all cases.

The state legislature overhauled its drug treatment and sentencing laws earlier this year.

Leaders from the fields of law enforcement, education, and medicine will meet today in Lexington, for the first Statewide Prescription Drug Abuse Summit in Kentucky. The issue has become a very serious concern across the state, as the number of people dying from prescription overdoses has increased. In fact, more people now die in Kentucky from prescription overdoses than are killed on the state's highways each year.