politics

Politics
11:03 am
Fri May 30, 2014

Democrats Plan Ad Buys In Some Rather Blue Places

Massachusetts Rep. John Tierney, shown with D.C. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton during a June 2013 hearing, is a blue-state Democrat who could be in a tight re-election race.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 3:06 pm

A list of the House races for which Democrats have asked broadcasters and cable companies to reserve $44 million in ad time provides a revealing look at the shape of the midterm election landscape this fall.

  • The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee plans to spend money in some of the bluest states on the map — places like Massachusetts, Illinois and California.
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Politics
10:33 am
Thu May 29, 2014

Common Cause Challenges McConnell, Grimes to Limit Ads Bought by Outside Groups

The U.S. Senate race in Kentucky could prove to be the most expensive Senate contest in history.
Credit Offices of Sen. McConnell and Sec. Grimes

A group that advocates for greater government transparency is challenging Kentucky’s U.S. Senate candidates to limit ads purchased by outside groups.

The Herald-Leader reports that Common Cause of Kentucky sent letters this week to the campaigns of Republican Senator Mitch McConnell and Democratic Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes, asking them to sign a pledge aimed at limiting outside spending on the Senate race.

Under what the group calls the People’s Pledge, a candidate would agree to give to charity half of the cost of any ad bought by outside groups during the campaign. Grimes campaign manager Jonathan Hurst told the paper that Grimes has previously called for both campaigns to sign the pledge.

The McConnell campaign had not commented on the request by Common Cause of Kentucky as of Wednesday afternoon.

Kentucky’s Senate race will be one of the most closely-watched races in the country, with some analysts predicting it will also be the most expensive Senate race in history.

Politics
1:01 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

Indiana GOP Considers Adding "Traditional Marriage" Language to Party Platform

Indiana Republicans will vote next month on a provision in their party’s platform that would reintroduce language about “traditional marriage.”

The Indiana GOP eliminated the language regarding traditional marriage in 2012. But party delegates  last week decided to reintroduce the issue to the party platform. Republican delegates next month will vote on whether to add the following language to their platform: “We believe that strong families, based on marriage between a man and a woman, are the foundation of society.”

Not all Hoosier State Republicans back the effort to reintroduce marriage language into the party’s platform. The Indianapolis Star-Tribune quotes GOP delegate Megan Robertson—who is gay—as saying the effort is “bad for the Republican Party.”

While the proposed platform also contains language that recognizes “diverse” family structures, Robertson says the platform should focus on issues that unite the party, as opposed to dividing it.

Those backing the platform say it contains recognition of “blended families, grandparents, guardians, and loving adults” who raise children.

Politics
12:00 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

It's Primary Election Day in Kentucky: Here Are State Legislature Primaries to Watch

Kentucky's primary election is Tuesday, May 20.

With an expected 30 percent (or less) voter turnout in Tuesday's primary elections, about 930,000 Kentuckians will take to the polls to determine which candidates will appear on the ballot during this fall's general election.

Kentucky political observers will be looking to see what impact the election's outcome will have on the Kentucky Democratic Party's bid to retain control of the state House against a Republican challenge.

With 23 seats contested in the House, here's a quick look at some of the races that will add clarity to that question:

District 10. Western Kentucky state Rep. Ben Waide, a Republican, has announced he'll be seeking Hopkins County judge-executive post, leaving the field wide open to three Republicans and a lone Democrat vying for a chance to replace him. Waide replaced longtime Democratic incumbent Eddie Ballard in 2010, besting Democratic opponent Michael Duncan by 1,596 votes. Democrats will be eager to win this seat back despite its newfound Republican leanings.

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Politics
4:15 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

Grimes Expecting Low Turnout for Tuesday's Primary Election

Kentucky's primary election will be held Tuesday, May 20.

Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes says that turnout for this Tuesday’s primary election isn’t likely to exceed 30 percent.

Grimes says without a presidential contest and without ballot initiatives like a local option sales tax, turnout among Kentucky’s 3.1 million registered voters will be lower than in some previous years.

“Based on conversations that we have had with our county clerks throughout the state, the fact that there is no local option question available, or on the ballot, and when we’re looking at the absentee numbers that are being reviewed by the state board of elections, they are lagging from where we were at this very time in ‘06 and 2013," the Secretary said.

About 1,000 offices will be up for grabs Tuesday across 3,700 voting precincts.

Polls will be open from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Politics
7:04 am
Tue May 6, 2014

5 Things To Watch In Tuesday's Primaries

North Carolina Republican Senate hopeful Greg Brannon (left) greets Adam Love and his daughter Gwendolyn Love during a campaign event in Charlotte, N.C., on Monday.
Chuck Burton AP

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 10:00 am

Get ready for election season.

Tuesday's primaries in Indiana, North Carolina and Ohio serve as the kickoff for an intense two-month stretch that will go a long way toward outlining the shape of the midterm election landscape.

By the end of June, more than half the states will have conducted their primary elections. And the answers to some of the most important questions about the November elections will be clearer.

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Politics
2:04 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Record Number of Kentucky Residents Eligible to Vote in May Primary

Kentucky's primary is May 20.

A record number of Kentuckians have registered to vote in advance of the May 20 primary.

The Kentucky Secretary of State’s Office reports that over 3.1 million Kentuckians are registered, reflecting an increase of more than 68,000 new voters over the last year and a half.

Democrats retain their historical edge in the state, representing nearly 54 percent of registered voters. Republicans come in just below 40 percent.

Politics
7:42 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

Democrat Challenging for 2nd District U.S. House Seat Upset Over Income Inequality

Ron Leach is challenging Republican Rep. Brett Guthrie for Kentucky's 2nd district House seat
Credit Ron Leach campaign

The Democrat running for Kentucky’s Second District U.S. House seat says Congress should pass a federal minimum wage bill.

Ron Leach was in Glasgow Thursday, and told WKU Public Radio one of the biggest themes of this year’s election will be the growing income inequality seen throughout the nation in recent years. The retired U.S. Army Major says he’d like to see the minimum wage increased $10.10 an hour.

“There’s no excuse for anyone working full-time, 40 hours a week, living in poverty. So, beyond the minimum wage, we need to be looking at a living wage,” the Meade County Democrat said. “We have way too many folks out there working full-time or working multiple jobs, yet still qualify for federal assistance.”

Leach is running for the seat currently held by three-term Republican Brett Guthrie of Bowling Green. 

Leach attacked what he called “immoral levels of compensation at the top” while employees earn “poverty wages.”

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Politics
9:13 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Republican-Led Kentucky Senate Wants to Defund ACA Through Next State Budget

Kentucky Senate President Robert Stivers (R-Manchester)
Credit Kentucky LRC

The Kentucky Senate’s $20 billion budget proposal aims to defund the Affordable Care Act in the commonwealth, but its provisions won’t affect the program.

The Senate’s executive budget that was passed Monday disallows state general funds from being used to fund the ACA, the commonwealth’s Medicaid expansion and the state health insurance exchange, Kynect, all of which are federally funded until the year 2017.

But the state budget only affects fiscal years 2014-2016, making the measure largely a political one in advance of November’s elections.

When asked what his chamber would do if the 321,000 Kentuckians enrolled via Kynect lost their coverage due to the ACA being defunded, Sen. President Robert Stivers said he would support “supplemental programs,” like health savings accounts, to help insure them.

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Politics
2:27 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Holder Speaks Out On Snowden, Drone Policy, Softening Sentences

Already one of the longest-serving attorneys general in history, Eric Holder says he has no immediate plans or timetable to leave. Here, he speaks at the annual Attorneys General Winter Meeting in Washington on Feb. 25.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 11:13 am

Virtually any time a major event ripples across Washington, the Justice Department is positioned near the center of it.

From the disappearance of a Malaysian airliner that carried three Americans on board to the fate of voting rights for millions of people, the attorney general has an enormous portfolio. And the stress to match it.

But after an elevated heart rate sent him to the hospital last month, Eric Holder says he's on the mend.

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