prescription abuse

A new report finds there has been an “alarming” increase in drug overdoses in Kentucky in recent years. The data compiled for the study was collected over an eleven year period.

The Kentucky Injury Prevention and Research Center says drug overdose mortality rates increased 282 percent between 2000 and 2010. In the Bluegrass State, that means the overdose mortality rate has jumped from six deaths per one hundred thousand people to nearly 23 deaths per one hundred thousand people during that eleven year period.

The Research Center is located in the University of Kentucky’s College of Public Health, and is an agent for the Kentucky Department of Public Health.  The new report is based on an examination of  emergency departments, inpatient hospitalization statistics, and mortality data.

The State of Kentucky is taking part in a national prescription drug take-back program to safely dispose of unused, unneeded or expired medications. The Drug Enforcement Administration's National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day is in effect Saturday September 29th from 10am until 2pm.

Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear has signed emergency regulations that require doctors to meet tougher prescription standards in an effort to stop drug abuse. The rules, which were given to given to state boards that oversee the medical industry on Friday, were presented to lawmakers this week and will remain in effect until permanent regulations are adopted.

The fourth national "Take Back"initiative is collecting unwanted prescription medications today at State Police Posts across Kentucky. The Kentucky State Police and the Drug Enforcement Agency are working together on the effort, which is designed to help reduce prescription abuse .


The Associated Press is reporting that Kentucky lawmakers have passed a measure that's intended to curb prescription drug abuse in the state.  A compromise passed by the Senate and House would require all physicians in the state to use a prescription drug monitoring system so addicts seeking painkillers can be more easily identified.


A change to the so-called pill bill in Frankfort has restarted the fight over the measure in the General Assembly. Prescription abuse is rampant in Kentucky, and the bill strengthens restrictions on the drugs and who can sell them.The measure didn't clear the General Assembly during this year's regular session, and lawmakers have been called in for a special session to reconsider the legislation.

Kentucky LRC

Governor Steve Beshear and a bi-partisan group of  lawmakers are urging members of the General Assembly to approve the Prescription Drug Abuse Bill known as HB 4.  The measure is sponsored by House Speaker Greg Stumbo, who says the bill was developed with the cooperation of healthcare professionals and law enforcement.  Only one day remains in the legislative session.

Leaders from the fields of law enforcement, education, and medicine will meet today in Lexington, for the first Statewide Prescription Drug Abuse Summit in Kentucky. The issue has become a very serious concern across the state, as the number of people dying from prescription overdoses has increased. In fact, more people now die in Kentucky from prescription overdoses than are killed on the state's highways each year.