same-sex marriage

Law
4:35 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Citing Supreme Court, Judge Awards Benefits To Same-Sex Widow

Another barrier to recognition of same-sex marriage appears to have fallen. On Monday a federal judge ordered a law firm to pay survivor's benefits to the widow in a same-sex marriage, and on Tuesday the law firm said it was happy to comply and would not appeal.

The decision is the latest in a series of court rulings equalizing benefits for legally married same-sex couples in the aftermath of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling.

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Regional
2:19 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Kentucky Couple Challenging State's Ban on Same-Sex Marriages

A Louisville couple has filed a challenge to Kentucky's ban on same-sex marriages.

They're asking a federal judge to require the state to recognize valid unions from other states and countries.

Gregory Bourke and Michael Deleon filed suit Friday morning in U.S. District Court in Louisville. The issue of same sex marriages and rights has been a hot topic at rallies in Louisville and across the country.

Burke and Deleon are seeking an injunction to stop state and local officials from enforcing the ban written into the Kentucky constitution in 2004.

The suit is the first such challenge in the state since the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the federal Defense of Marriage Act.

That's a federal law blocking married same-sex couples from receiving the same benefits as heterosexual spouses.

Politics
9:33 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Rand Paul: Supreme Court Decision on Same-Sex Marriage Step Closer to Human-Animal Unions

U.S. Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY)

Kentucky Senator Rand Paul has suggested that Wednesday’s Supreme Court ruling on gay marriage will move the country closer to accepting marriages between people and animals.

A spokeswoman for the Bowling Green Republican insists the Senator was being sarcastic.

Paul’s comments came during an appearance on Glenn Beck’s radio program. Beck asked the Kentucky Senator if the Supreme Court’s decision to strike down the Defense of Marriage Act would eventually lead to the legalization of polygamous marriage. Paul responded by saying, “I think it’s a conundrum. If we have no laws on this, people take it to one extension further, does it have to be humans, you know?”

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Regional
12:54 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Minter: Supreme Court Decision Does Not Impact Kentucky Law on Same-Sex Marriage

The U.S. Supreme Court has declared the Defense of Marriage Act unconstitutional.

The U.S. Supreme's Court ruling Wednesday striking down the federal Defense of Marriage Act does not impact Kentucky laws regarding the definition of marriage. Kentucky voters in 2004 approved an amendment to the state constitution defining a marriage as being between one man and one woman.

WKU constitutional law scholar Patty Minter says the Supreme Court's decision on DOMA concerns those in same-sex marriages being able to receive the same federal benefits as those in heterosexual marriages.

"It does not affect the definition of marriage in Kentucky, and it does not require the state of Kentucky to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. It also has no impact on civil unions anywhere in the 50 states," Dr. Minter told WKU Public Radio.

Dr. Minter, a WKU History Professor, says those wanting same-sex marriage in Kentucky would likely have to get a referendum on the ballot that would repeal the 2004 state amendment.

"Or you would need another case at the U.S. Supreme Court--one that rendered all of those state marriage amendments to be moot. They would also be rendered moot if you passed a federal amendment to the Constitution that mandated that marriage rights could not be abridged based on status.

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