Science news

One of TV’s best known science educators, Bill Nye, wrapped up this week’s visit to Kentucky by debating the founder of the Creation Museum Tuesday evening.

Ken Ham, the founder and CEO of the museum in Northern Kentucky, challenged Nye to debate the topic, “Is Creationism a viable model of origins in today’s modern scientific era.”  

Ham believes science can be reconciled with a belief that the world was created in six days and is only six thousand years old, a view that comes from a literal interpretation of the Bible.

“I don’t know of any other religion that has a book that starts off by telling you there’s an infinite God and talks about the origin of the universe and the origin of matter and the origin of light and the origin of darkness and the origin of day and night," Ham said during the debate.

Ham invited Nye to debate following Nye’s 2012 YouTube video in which he stated that teaching divine creation was harmful to children and to American society.

Kentucky Creation Museum Debate Tickets Already Sold Out

Jan 7, 2014

Tickets to an evolution debate with science advocate Bill Nye at Kentucky's Creation Museum have sold out on the first day.

The Creation Museum said in a news release Monday that tickets for the debate in its 900-seat auditorium sold out just minutes after they were offered online in the morning. Nye, a former TV star known as "The Science Guy," has agreed to visit the museum and debate founder Ken Ham.

As a creationist, Ham is a critic of evolution and says the Bible's Old Testament provides the answers to the Earth's beginnings. Nye spoke out against teaching creationism to kids in a YouTube video that went viral last year.

The debate is set for 7 p.m. EST Feb. 4.

Science guy Bill Nye is set to visit Kentucky next month for a debate on science and creation with Creation Museum founder Ken Ham.

Ham wrote on his Facebook page that the museum will play host to Nye, the former host of a popular youth science show, on Feb. 4.

Nye has been critical of creationists for their opposition to evolution and asserting that the Old Testament is a literal account of the earth’s beginnings. Last year in an online video that drew nearly six million views, Nye said teaching creationism was bad for children.

The video prompted a response video from the Creation Museum and Ham later challenged him to a debate.

The event will be titled “Is Creation A Viable Model of Origins?” The museum is planning to charge admission.

As Robert Krulwich says, "it's going to be a very small picture, but we're all going to be in it — all trillions of us on Earth."

Former Indiana governor, now Purdue University President Mitch Daniels, has joined a panel that will make recommendations about the future of the nation's space program. 

The Committee on Human Spaceflight is part of the 2010 NASA Authorization Act. Its purpose is to review the space program's long-term goals and direction and suggest ways to sustain it. 

Daniels says Purdue has a long history with the space program and that he's honored to serve on the panel. Purdue's alumni include astronauts Virgil `Gus' Grissom, Roger Chaffee, Neil Armstrong and Eugene Cernan. Armstrong was the first man on the moon, and Cernan was the last. 

Daniels will serve as co-chairman of the committee through June 30, 2014.