Science news

In recognition of "Earth Hour" activities around the world, lights on the State Capitol in Frankfort were dimmed for one hour Saturday. "Earth Hour" is an international program backed by the World Wildlife Federation, to recognize the need to conserve energy and protect the environment.

National Park Service

Biologists in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park have confirmed that two bats found in a park cave have white-nose syndrome. The fungus that causes the disease had been found earlier in the Smokies.

Vickie Carson

Professional archaeologists in Kentucky are sharing research and project updates this weekend at Mammoth Cave National Park. The conference, which runs through noon Sunday, is co-sponsored by the WKU Department of Folk Studies and Anthropology, the Kentucky Organization of Professional Archeologists, and the WKU Office of the Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs.

A disease that has killed millions of bats in eastern North America has been found in three central Kentucky caves.

Kentucky Fish and Wildlife Resources says three common bat species tested positive for the fungus responsible for white-nose syndrome. The species are the Northern long-eared, tri-colored and little brown bats.

The caves are privately owned and not open to the public. The department says they are northeast of Hardinsburg in Breckinridge County.

WKU Public Radio

A new study indicates that air quality in Bowling Green Hospitality venues has improved since a smoke-free ordinance took effect last spring. The new study, which was funded by the Kentucky Cancer Consortium and the Barren River Area Health Department, found an 83 percent decline in indoor air pollution since the smoke-free ordinance was established.

Ten hospitality venues were monitored in the study, using a device called a TSI Sidepak. That device monitored air quality every sixty seconds in the venues included in the report.