special needs children

Franklin-Simpson High School

A $3 million federal grant will go towards efforts to improve the career and college readiness of special needs students at nine Kentucky high schools.

The four-year grant awarded to the Green River Regional Educational Cooperative will model a program currently in place at Franklin-Simpson High School. That program matches educators and disabled students for an hour a week, with the educator focusing on ways to help the student achieve success in the classroom.

“So she might help him to catch up on homework, she might work on his study skills, she might arrange for him to do an internship down the road at a business or an industry,” said Johna Rogers, with the GRREC.  

Rodgers says the idea is to provide consistent, one-on-one guidance that will help special-needs students reach their educational and career goals. Each student in the program will have what’s known as an Individual Career Plan, tailored to the individual’s aspirations and abilities.

“And I think that is one of the key strategies—identifying chunks of time where teachers, who are specially trained to work on college-career readiness, are able to move that child forward from wherever he is, to where he wants to be.”

The nine schools included in the grant are:

Kentucky high school graduates with special needs may now request an alternative high school diploma from their local board of education. 

State Senator Dennis Parrett of Elizabethtown sponsored legislation last year to give students who finished a modified curriculum an alternative diploma. Until then, they were given only a certificate of attainment. 

Under a change that took effect in January, special needs students who graduated before the law took affect, may now retroactively request an alternative high school diploma.