suicide

Melanie Carter-Hack

Twelve percent of high school sophomores in Kentucky have a suicide plan and eight percent have attempted suicide. A report by Kentucky Incentives for Prevention says there’s also a disturbing national trend among younger children. The suicide rate for 10-to-14-year-olds doubled between 2007 and 2014.

The tragedy of adolescents taking their own lives is a reality in Kentucky.  A Hardin County mom, Melanie Carter-Hack, talks about the bullying that she believes contributed to the suicide of her 12-year-old daughter, Reagan Carter.

"We were living in Bardstown, Kentucky in Nelson County and Reagan was a 7th grader at Bardstown Middle School. We had never had any issues in the primary school, the elementary school. I mean, these were kids she had grown up with. And then 7th grade year was just a little bit different.

Flickr/Creative Commons

A recent state report shows 15 percent of high school sophomores in Kentucky have thought about taking their own lives. Some teenagers in Kentucky have done more than think about suicide.

The latest report from Kentucky Incentives for Prevention, or KIP, shows 12 percent of high school sophomores have made a plan to take their own lives. And eight percent have attempted suicide.

Joy Graham is director of the LifeSkills Regional Prevention Center in Bowling Green and a suicide prevention specialist who conducts training for area educators. Graham says said the community needs to talk about suicide because it does happen here.

Flickr/Creative Commons/Ava Randa

A southern Kentucky education leader is issuing a warning to parents about a controversial new series on Netflix.  The superintendent of Warren County schools is worried about the way the show handles the issue of suicide and young people.

The series “13 Reasons Why” chronicles the suicide of a young woman who leaves behind 13 messages to people in her life that she blamed for her death.  The drama also addresses bullying, substance abuse, rape, and depression. 

Warren County Schools Superintendent Rob Clayton says he doesn’t recommend young people viewing the series.

"I do think that if a parent finds that their child is going to watch it, it would be best if they would watch it with them," Clayton told WKU Public Radio.  "The one benefit of that is that it would open up some potential dialogue."

Research in Kentucky to Explore Impact of Military Suicides

Aug 21, 2012

With the rate of suicides among military personnel continuing to rise, a University of Kentucky professor is leading a study to investigate the effect those deaths have on family and friends left behind. Based on previous research, it’s estimated that around 40% of Kentuckians know someone who has taken their own life.