U of L

J. Tyler Franklin

The University of Louisville’s accreditation is no longer under probation. The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, or SACS, announced today that U of L met nine “concerns in areas of governance, administration and finance”  it set down to lift the probation.

The university was placed on probation by SACS a year ago amid concerns raised by Gov. Matt Bevin’s reorganization of the board of trustees, along with a list of other issues.

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Former University of Louisville men’s basketball coach Rick Pitino has filed a breach of contract lawsuit against the university’s athletic association.

Pitino was fired for cause last month by the association’s board amid an FBI investigation into college basketball recruiting.

The suit, filed Thursday in federal court, says the school effectively fired Pitino in late September when it placed him on administrative leave and locked him out of his office. It says Pitino should have been given 10 days’ notice and an opportunity to be heard, as specified in his contract.

J. Tyler Franklin

The University of Louisville has appointed an acting athletic director.

Louisville businessman Vince Tyra, a member of the U of L Foundation board and the son of the late U of L basketball star Charlie Tyra, will take over the duties of Tom Jurich.

Jurich was suspended with pay last week after it was revealed that the U of L men’s basketball program is included in a federal complaint alleging that high school recruits were given bribes to attend schools sponsored by the Adidas apparel company.

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The governing body of University of Louisville athletics has given Interim President Greg Postel the go-ahead to begin termination proceedings against men’s basketball coach Rick Pitino.

The U of L Athletic Association unanimously approved the motion after meeting behind closed doors for about two hours Monday.

Pitino was placed on unpaid leave last week after he was implicated in a federal investigation into the alleged bribery of high school recruits.

J. Tyler Franklin

University of Louisville’s interim president said he won’t allow “current events and distractions” to keep the school from moving forward as it navigates the latest scandal in a series of troubles.

Interim President Gregory Postel said the school is cooperating with federal prosecutors and the FBI as they investigate what he called a “dramatic story”— allegations that the school’s basketball program was involved in a bribery scandal that funneled money to the families of top basketball recruits.

J. Tyler Franklin

The Supreme Court of Kentucky has ruled in favor of Gov. Matt Bevin in a legal challenge over whether he had the authority to overhaul the University of Louisville’s board of trustees last year.

The high court said the issue was moot because the state legislature approved legislation effectively codifying Bevin’s restructuring of the board earlier this year.

“It is for this reason — a deliberate action by the General Assembly intervening to provide greater clarity of law — that the case today is moot,” the court said in an order dismissing the case.

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Federal investigators announced charges Tuesday in a wide-scale corruption scheme in college basketball.

Federal court documents implicate university and amateur coaches, officials with Adidas and sports money managers.

Court documents imply that the University of Louisville was part of the investigation, which includes a secretly recorded meeting in which one university coach allegedly discusses illegal payments to a recruit’s family.

U of L’s interim president, Gregory Postel, confirmed the school’s involvement in a statement released Tuesday afternoon.

Ryland Barton

Justices on Kentucky’s Supreme Court heard arguments over whether Gov. Matt Bevin had the right to overhaul the University of Louisville board of trustees last year under a law that gives the governor power to reshape state boards while the legislature isn’t in session.

J. Tyler Franklin

Gov. Matt Bevin and Attorney General Andy Beshear will square off before the Kentucky Supreme Court on Friday in a case dealing with how much power the governor has to reshape state university boards.

Bevin has appealed a lower court’s ruling that he didn’t have the authority to overhaul the University of Louisville board of trustees.

Bevin abolished U of L’s governing board lats year, severing the four-year terms of the 15 appointed members of the panel, which he called “dysfunctional.”

J. Tyler Franklin, WFPL

Updated June 26, 2017 at 1:35 p.m.:

The Public Protection Cabinet had previously told board leaders that Governor Bevin planned to issue an executive order as early as July 1 that would alter how the medical and professional boards operate.  However, the restructuring will not occur July 1, according to Cabinet Spokeswoman Elizabeth Kuhn who issued the following statement:

"The Public Protection Cabinet continues to work with each licensing board, stakeholders, and legislators to receive feedback regarding the proposed reorganization.  The Cabinet is working to fine tune the proposed reorganization based on the feedback we have received, and we look forward to proceeding with the reorganization plan, which will benefit licensed professionals throughout the Commonwealth."

Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin is planning to reorganize dozens of medical and professional oversight boards. 

The panels control the licensing of thousands of professionals in Kentucky and investigate complaints filed against them.  The Kentucky Public Protection Cabinet says those boards currently operate without sufficient state oversight. 

Cabinet officials declined to be interviewed, but pointed out that in  2015, the U.S. Supreme Court held in North Carolina Dental Board v. Federal Trade Commission that professional licensing boards comprised of market participants (board members who hold active licenses in the profession they regulate) must be supervised by the state to avoid anti-trust liability.

University of Louisville

Less than a day after a member of the University of Louisville’s investigative committee looking into allegations of prostitution within the men’s basketball program spoke out against the school’s decision to self-impose a postseason ban, the university is attempting to clarify the committee’s role.

It is the first time any U of L official has spoken publicly about details of the committee, despite inquiries from WFPL and other media for more information.

The statement from U of L also comes after men’s basketball coach Rick Pitino last week told a national ESPN radio show that Athletic Director Tom Jurich made the decision to keep the team out of the Atlantic Coast Conference and NCAA tournaments this season. The school had previously said it was U of L President James Ramsey’s call, and reiterated that in a statement today.

U of L Professor Ricky Jones, chair of the Pan-African Studies Department and a member of the investigative committee, told The Courier-Journal on Monday that he disagreed with the decision to self-impose a ban.

“There was nothing we saw that implicated anyone but Andre McGee,” Jones told the C-J.

Contractor Hired To Tear Down Well-known Silos

Jun 20, 2014
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A Louisville landmark will be coming down with the hiring of a contractor to demolish 22 concrete silos that spell out University of Louisville.

The UofL Foundation said Friday it has hired a demolition firm to begin work to clear the site along Interstate 65.

The school says the winning bidder submitted the lowest proposed price of $687,800 for the project.

The firm will remove the silos and several smaller structures on the 15-acre site.

UofL's foundation purchased the property for $3.3 million from Solae Co., a DuPont subsidiary, last December.

An internationally-recognized cancer research team is leaving one Kentucky university for another.

A group of top researchers is leaving the University of Louisville for the University of Kentucky, one month after UK announced it was becoming home to the state’s first National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center.

The Courier-Journal reports the four researchers will establish the UK Center for Regulatory and Environmental Analytical Metabolomics, or UK-CREAM. The center is expected to bring to UK over $17-million in federal funding over five years.

Officials at UK say they didn’t actively recruit the U of L researchers, but were instead approached by them.

One of the researchers, Andrew Lane, said he and colleagues made the move because UK was in “an expansion phase, particularly in cancer, which is very attractive to us.”

One of Kentucky’s most famous philanthropists has died in Louisville. Owsley Brown Frazier was 77. Frazier was the great-grandson of the distiller who founded Brown-Forman Corp., whose brands include Woodford Reserve, Jack Daniels, and Old Forester.

The panel that regulates tuition rates for Kentucky's state colleges and universities has finalized tuition hikes for the 2012-2013 school year that go as high as 6%.